Making Talk Radio Fair and Balanced

There are two sides to every issue. Unless, of course, you’re a conservative.

For conservatives, there’s only one side to every issue — and only one point of view that should ever be heard on the airwaves.

Conservatives, in fact, are panicking over a talk radio study released by the Center for American Progress that shows that there are nine hours of right-wing talk radio for every one hour of progressive talk.

Nobody disputes the accuracy of the Center’s findings. But now that the cat’s out of the bag, conservatives are afraid the FCC might take action. So Indiana Republican Rep. Mike Pence has introduced in Congress what he calls the “Broadcaster Freedom Act” — which bans the FCC from reinstating the Fairness Doctrine — and he claims to be picking up lots of cosponsors among fellow Republicans.

As a nationally syndicated liberal talk show host, I want to know: What are they afraid of?

The Fairness Doctrine would not censor anybody. It would not require Rush Limbaugh or Sean Hannity to have a liberal co-host. It would not shut anybody down.

All the Fairness Doctrine would do is require stations, or station owners, to present more than one point of view. To offer a variety of voices. In other words, to provide a little “balance” in talk radio where there is none today. It can’t be all right-wing, all the time, which is the case with most stations today.

And what’s wrong with that? After all, these are public airwaves — which should be used to serve all the public, not just right-wingers.

Based on their abnormal alarm over the Fairness Doctrine, it’s obvious that conservatives are afraid to compete on a level playing field. Which I find strange indeed.

After all, their house organ prides itself on being “fair and balanced.” Maybe, for once, conservatives should practice what they preach. Bring back the Fairness Doctrine.