The man who just won’t quit

It appears Michael Steele has many pseudonyms — and many that can't be repeated on this G-rated page. But the one that seems best suited, today, is The Man Who Just Won't Quit.
 
Earlier this week, Steele shocked much of political Washington when he called an audible and, instead of gracefully bowing out of his stained chairmanship of the Republican National Committee (RNC) while touting his successes, declared he would run again for the post.
 
Here we go again.
 
How can a marvelous face for the new Republican Party of the 21st century, one who narrowly lost a U.S. Senate race in Maryland, fall from grace so far and so fast?
 
By any standard, Steele's tenure has been mediocre at best — an embarrassment to the party at worst — and, I daresay, a mixed bag for the country. Instead of challenging the president and his allies from a powerful perch, he complained to the media he wasn't getting enough credit for all the wins he helped secure. At the same time, he was watching hundreds of thousands go out the RNC front door because he had alienated so many big donors.
 
A few months ago, even members of the RNC doubted they could mount a successful campaign against Steele. There was still power in the color of his skin and his moments of brilliance. Republicans would appear as though they were "turning back the clock" by ousting such a public face for the party, and one of color to boot. What foolish thinking. When will the Republicans — or even Democrats for that matter (see: Charlie Rangel) — realize that actions matter, and one doesn't get a free pass just because he or she is a minority? Get rid of someone like Steele because he is terrible at his job; don’t keep him around for fear of alienating a voting bloc that walked away long ago. One man did not push the black vote away, and Michael Steele certainly cannot bring the American black voter back to the Republican fold.
 
There was a time when Steele would be heralded for his never-say-die attitude — for his tenacity to keep on fighting, even in the face of extreme odds. That was a Michael Steele who no one wanted to throw in the towel. But that was then, and this is now. Today, for the sake of his party and his own self-respect, the man must seriously consider gracefully stepping down from his post as chairman of the GOP. 


Armstrong Williams is on Sirius/XM Power 169, 7-8 p.m. and 4-5 a.m., Monday through Friday. Become a fan on Facebook at www.facebook.com/arightside, and follow him on Twitter at www.twitter.com/arightside.