Majority Whip Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyMcCarthy: ‘No deadline on DACA’ Hoyer suggests Dems won't support spending bill without DACA fix The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (R) from California is the frontrunner and the clear establishment choice to replace Eric CantorEric Ivan CantorEric Cantor: Moore ‘deserves to lose’ If we want to make immigration great again, let's make it bipartisan Top Lobbyists 2017: Hired Guns MORE (R) as majority leader, and Illinois's Peter Roskam Peter James RoskamOvernight Finance: Congress barrels toward another shutdown crisis | Canada worries Trump will withdraw from NAFTA | Blue-state Republicans push tax law changes | Chamber CEO calls out Bannon, Warren New chairmen named for health, tax subcommittees House GOP super PAC expands field offices to 27 districts MORE (R) is reportedly also getting a similar push to ascend to McCarthy's spot as the whip.

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California and Illinois contributed 75 of the 270 Electoral votes needed to elect Barack Obama president, and their state governments, which draw congressional district lines, are overwhelmingly controlled by Democratic machines.

Each state is suffering from massive budget crises and they are likely to be first and second in line for federal government bailouts of their rapidly deteriorating pensions systems.

Yet, many House Republicans somehow think it is a good idea to put their collective political fortunes into the hands of members whose very political existence depends upon a politically motivated stroke of a redistricting pen.

Unlike the Newt Gingrich-led Republican revolution in 1995, where Texans Dick Armey and Tom DeLay manned these posts under the Georgian, the not-so-Tea-Party Republican Conference seems to be leaning toward leaders who are dependent upon in-state Democratic regimes. This is hardly the prescription for making the kind of hard budget choices and fighting the battles that will define our nation for the next decade.

Yet, at this writing, no conservative candidate has announced for the majority leader spot, and the alternative for whip, Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseGOP leaders pitch children's health funding in plan to avert shutdown Scalise ‘resting comfortably’ after follow-up surgery from shooting Scalise to undergo another surgery after shooting MORE (La.), has proven to be more of a cheerleader for Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerDems face hard choice for State of the Union response Even some conservatives seem open to return to earmarks Overnight Finance: Trump, lawmakers take key step to immigration deal | Trump urges Congress to bring back earmarks | Tax law poised to create windfall for states | Trump to attend Davos | Dimon walks back bitcoin criticism MORE (Ohio) than a leader for the conservative Republican Study Committee.

And this is one of the true revelations of this once in a lifetime, midterm leadership fight. After all the concerns voiced about the direction that Boehner's team is taking the House, no one is rising up to the challenge now that the opportunity is present.

While leadership elections are very similar to student-body elections in that it is in many cases more about personality and less about philosophy, time is almost up for House conservatives to seize this opportunity to lead our nation, or be rendered obsolete backbenchers and gadflies who can't be taken seriously.

As of this writing, it seems that the latter is more likely than the former, and our nation will suffer as a result.

Manning (@rmanning957) is vice president of public policy and communications for Americans for Limited Government. Contact him at rmanning@getliberty.org.