In my recent column, Hillary: The next FDR, I suggested that Democrats are on the brink of winning a historic political realignment. This week a long list of Republicans appear determined to prove me right.

ADVERTISEMENT
Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump: If there's no wall, there's no DACA fix Schumer: Democrats 'cut the best deal we could' Dems sour on shutdown tactics MORE (Ky.) filibustered against his own debt-ceiling proposal after Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidDems search for winning playbook Dems face hard choice for State of the Union response The Memo: Immigration battle tests activists’ muscle MORE (D-Nev.) called his bluff. Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainUS sends A-10 squadron to Afghanistan for first time in three years McCain: ‘All of us share responsibility’ for government shutdown GOP strategist: Shutdown is on Trump and GOP MORE (R-Ariz.), the most respected Republican on military issues, blasted freshman Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulOvernight Regulation: Trump’s former chemical safety nominee leaving EPA | Senate confirms Powell as Fed chair | NTSB 'gathering information' on Tesla crash Overnight Finance: Senate confirms Powell as Fed chair | Mulvaney declares 'new mission' for consumer bureau | Trump says solar tariffs will boost jobs Senate confirms Jerome Powell as Fed chairman MORE (R-Ky.) when Paul abused the rules to obstruct a major defense bill. Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.), who probably realizes Republicans are consigned to long-term minority status in the Senate and is leaving, criticized Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerGOP sees omens of a Dem wave in Wisconsin Dems face hard choice for State of the Union response Even some conservatives seem open to return to earmarks MORE (Ohio) because BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerGOP sees omens of a Dem wave in Wisconsin Dems face hard choice for State of the Union response Even some conservatives seem open to return to earmarks MORE suggests increasing revenue.  And most Senate Republicans opposed a convention about disabilities supported by recent Republican presidents even while former Sen. Bob Dole (R-Kan.), an American hero, visited the Senate floor to show his support.

There is a distemper in the Republican Party today. There are reasons that Democrats have won three of the last four national elections, in 2006, 2008 and 2012. There are reasons that every poll shows that if America crashes over the "fiscal cliff," the Republicans will reap most of the blame. Yet Republicans keep doing the things that have caused them to lose most recent national elections.

Was it Einstein who said that insanity is to keep making the same mistakes and expecting things to turn out differently?

So: Mitch McConnell tries to abuse the rules with a clever ploy and Harry Reid outsmarts him, as McConnell proves Reid's case against the filibuster by filibustering against himself.

And: Rand Paul abuses the rules to obstruct an important defense bill and is reprimanded by war hero John McCain.

And: Jim DeMint folds his tent in the Senate, as House Republicans head for the hills to go home, determined to be blamed for the fiscal crash their behavior could cause.

And then a long list of Republicans, having lost their war against women in recent elections, declare war against the disabled. They believe they know better than George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush, Bob Dole and John McCain, who all support the convention that would help the disabled.

Perhaps DeMint can take his case for the wealthiest Americans to the Senate Banking Committee, where he can be publicly questioned by the new rising star in American politics, Sen.-elect Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenOvernight Regulation: Trump’s former chemical safety nominee leaving EPA | Senate confirms Powell as Fed chair | NTSB 'gathering information' on Tesla crash Overnight Finance: Senate confirms Powell as Fed chair | Mulvaney declares 'new mission' for consumer bureau | Trump says solar tariffs will boost jobs Senate confirms Jerome Powell as Fed chairman MORE (D-Mass.).