Ben Carson and the wealthy conservative victim class

He sounded like millionaire crony capitalist Newt Gingrich, millionaire former Fox News personality Sarah Palin, millionaire pizza magnate and would-be president Herman Cain, and other wealthy conservatives who enjoy playing the role of victims.

When a politician goes to a National Prayer Breakfast and misuses the occasion to make nasty, insulting comments toward a sitting president there to join in prayer and worship, that politician (in this case Carson) should have been taught long ago to have more respect for moments of prayer and worship.

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Where I come from, he would simply be compared to the eastern end of a horse headed west with behavior such as this, a description that has everything do to with his misbehavior at a prayer breakfast and nothing to do with his race, gender or myopic opinions.

When Carson behaves this way, he has earned a spanking for his misbehavior and not a standing ovation from the partisans and ideologues of the right. Have they learned anything while enjoying two terms of President Barack Obama, while facing a high prospect they will next enjoy two terms of President Hillary Clinton?

I doubt that Carson will be anointed the new Republican "savior" (though the previous GOP savior is having a tough time these days).

I hope that in the end Carson does give his commencement speech at Johns Hopkins University, whose management so unwisely selected him to headline and whose students are now spanking Carson with protests after his latest insults to gays, which he more or less apologized for, presumably until his next insult to gays or the president or some other group.

This matter has nothing to do with Carson's silly charge that he is a victim of evil, white, vicious, liberal racism. This is more parody than politics.

The larger issue is how Carson, Palin, Cain and Gingrich are among the wealthy elites of the Republican right who refuse (listen to this carefully, conservatives) to take responsibility for their actions. Some on the right talk a good game about personal responsibility, but when they transgress or fail because of their own shortcomings, they whine and moan and blame others for their failures.

Leno and Fallon have nothing to worry about from the gentleman from Johns Hopkins.