Last month, I penned a piece for the U.S. News & World Report highlighting the recruiting successes Republicans have had over Democrats, both in senatorial and congressional races. Since then, the successful GOP recruitment has only continued.

This week alone, National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) Chairman John CornynJohn CornynMcConnell: Mueller 'ought to wrap it up' Senate rejects effort to boost Congress's national security oversight Graham jokes about Corker: GOP would have to be organized to be a cult MORE (Texas) has two major successes to herald — the prime recruitment of New Hampshire Attorney General Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteErnst, Fischer to square off for leadership post The Hill's Morning Report: Koch Network re-evaluating midterm strategy amid frustrations with GOP Audit finds US Defense Department wasted hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars MORE, who was appointed to the position by the Democratic governor, and Illinois Rep. Mark KirkMark Steven KirkThis week: Trump heads to Capitol Hill Trump attending Senate GOP lunch Tuesday High stakes as Trump heads to Hill MORE, both of whom jumped into Senate races in their respective states. These are top recruits for the GOP.

Is the news as good for Democrats? Yeah, not so much.

In the same week that Minnesota Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenBill Clinton says 'norms have changed' in society for what 'you can do to somebody against their will' The Hill's Morning Report — Trump: `A very great moment in the history of the world’ Trump to hold campaign rally in Minnesota next week MORE (yes, we can officially call him that now) gave Senate Democrats a filibuster-proof majority, Democrats can't seem to land the candidates they need. In Illinois, Attorney General Lisa Madigan said no to a race after overtures from White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel and Senate Majority Whip Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinHugh Hewitt to Trump: 'It is 100 percent wrong to separate border-crossing families' Opioid treatment plans must include a trauma-informed approach Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — Dems want answers on DOJ ObamaCare decision MORE, both from Illinois, and a private audience with Chicagoan Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaShould President Trump, like President Obama, forsake human rights in pursuit of the deal with a tyrant? Obama shares summer reading list ‘Three Californias’ plan would give Dems more seats MORE. One can't overstate this recruiting failure, especially after Emanuel called Madigan the "800-pound gorilla" (not usually a compliment one gives a lady) and the "most popular figure in the state of Illinois."

That loss was bad enough, but it was not the only recruiting failure surfacing for Democrats this week. Despite repeated overtures, popular South Dakota Rep. Stephanie Herseth Sandlin, who represents an at-large seat — meaning that she has been elected statewide — said no to challenging Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneMcConnell: Mueller 'ought to wrap it up' Graham jokes about Corker: GOP would have to be organized to be a cult Ernst, Fischer to square off for leadership post MORE (R).

Not to be outdone is the Empire State, where Rep. Carolyn Maloney said no to pleas from Democratic leaders to stay of out a primary against newly appointed Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandCongress must confront sexual abuse of military children The Hill's Morning Report — Can the economy help Republicans buck political history in 2018? Sanders gets best reception at early 2020 audition MORE. Making her "no" more emphatic, Maloney announced a trump card: the support of former President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonBill Clinton hits Trump administration policy separating immigrant families in Father's Day tweet Trump's strategy for North Korea and beyond James Comey's higher disloyalty to America MORE. In other words, in the New York Democratic primary, it's game on!

With headline after headline burying the Republican Party, it's important to point out where things are going right for the party. So it must be noted that John Cornyn's team has repeatedly outraised Democrats — both in funding and in actual candidates.

There's an old saying in Washington: "When the president calls, you say yes." When it comes to candidate recruitment, however, it appears the Democrats make up the "Party of No."