Last month, I penned a piece for the U.S. News & World Report highlighting the recruiting successes Republicans have had over Democrats, both in senatorial and congressional races. Since then, the successful GOP recruitment has only continued.

This week alone, National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) Chairman John CornynJohn CornynCornyn: Border wall 'makes absolutely no sense' in some areas Ryan on border: ‘We will get this done’ Ryan tours Mexican border on horseback MORE (Texas) has two major successes to herald — the prime recruitment of New Hampshire Attorney General Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteLewandowski saw no evidence of voter fraud in New Hampshire NH governor 'not aware’ of major voter fraud Former NH AG: 'Allegations of voter fraud in NH are baseless' MORE, who was appointed to the position by the Democratic governor, and Illinois Rep. Mark KirkMark KirkGOP senator won't vote to defund Planned Parenthood The Hill's 12:30 Report Trump, judges on collision course MORE, both of whom jumped into Senate races in their respective states. These are top recruits for the GOP.

Is the news as good for Democrats? Yeah, not so much.

In the same week that Minnesota Sen. Al FrankenAl FrankenDeVos: 'My job isn’t to win a popularity contest with the media' Kentucky Dem lawmaker questions Trump's mental health Americans should get used to pop culture blending with politics MORE (yes, we can officially call him that now) gave Senate Democrats a filibuster-proof majority, Democrats can't seem to land the candidates they need. In Illinois, Attorney General Lisa Madigan said no to a race after overtures from White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel and Senate Majority Whip Dick DurbinDick DurbinDems rip Trump administration for revoking Obama's transgender directive A guide to the committees: Senate McConnell: I’m very sympathetic to 'Dreamers' MORE, both from Illinois, and a private audience with Chicagoan Barack ObamaBarack ObamaObama left school bathrooms a mess Obama draws crowd, cheers in NYC Axelrod: Congress would have 'raised hell' if Obama team asked FBI to kill story on probe MORE. One can't overstate this recruiting failure, especially after Emanuel called Madigan the "800-pound gorilla" (not usually a compliment one gives a lady) and the "most popular figure in the state of Illinois."

That loss was bad enough, but it was not the only recruiting failure surfacing for Democrats this week. Despite repeated overtures, popular South Dakota Rep. Stephanie Herseth Sandlin, who represents an at-large seat — meaning that she has been elected statewide — said no to challenging Sen. John ThuneJohn ThuneConquering Trump returns to conservative summit Low-income consumer broadband credits mean competitiveness, choice and compassion ­ObamaCare fix hinges on Medicaid clash in Senate MORE (R).

Not to be outdone is the Empire State, where Rep. Carolyn Maloney said no to pleas from Democratic leaders to stay of out a primary against newly appointed Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandSanders, not Trump, is the real working-class hero Dem senator predicts Gorsuch will be confirmed A guide to the committees: Senate MORE. Making her "no" more emphatic, Maloney announced a trump card: the support of former President Bill ClintonBill ClintonHillary Clinton rallies DNC members in video message Obama draws crowd, cheers in NYC Ginsburg: Trump Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch is 'very easy to get along with' MORE. In other words, in the New York Democratic primary, it's game on!

With headline after headline burying the Republican Party, it's important to point out where things are going right for the party. So it must be noted that John Cornyn's team has repeatedly outraised Democrats — both in funding and in actual candidates.

There's an old saying in Washington: "When the president calls, you say yes." When it comes to candidate recruitment, however, it appears the Democrats make up the "Party of No."