Republicans Say Yes to Recruitment; Dems the New 'Party of No'

Last month, I penned a piece for the U.S. News & World Report highlighting the recruiting successes Republicans have had over Democrats, both in senatorial and congressional races. Since then, the successful GOP recruitment has only continued.

This week alone, National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) Chairman John CornynJohn CornynSenate to vote on two gun bills Senate Dems rip GOP on immigration ruling Post Orlando, hawks make a power play MORE (Texas) has two major successes to herald — the prime recruitment of New Hampshire Attorney General Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteMcConnell quashes Senate effort on guns Republicans blast latest Gitmo transfer Bipartisan gun measure survives test vote MORE, who was appointed to the position by the Democratic governor, and Illinois Rep. Mark KirkMark KirkThe Trail 2016: Berning embers Senate Dems link court fight to Congressional Baseball Game Bipartisan gun measure survives test vote MORE, both of whom jumped into Senate races in their respective states. These are top recruits for the GOP.

Is the news as good for Democrats? Yeah, not so much.

In the same week that Minnesota Sen. Al FrankenAl FrankenAl Franken says he would be Clinton's vice president if asked Poll: Sanders, Rubio most popular VP picks Bernie Sanders’s awkward return to the Senate MORE (yes, we can officially call him that now) gave Senate Democrats a filibuster-proof majority, Democrats can't seem to land the candidates they need. In Illinois, Attorney General Lisa Madigan said no to a race after overtures from White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel and Senate Majority Whip Dick DurbinDick DurbinSenate Dems link court fight to Congressional Baseball Game Dems: Immigration decision will 'energize' Hispanic voters Senate Dems rip GOP on immigration ruling MORE, both from Illinois, and a private audience with Chicagoan Barack ObamaBarack ObamaOur most toxic export: American politick State Dept. insists Brexit won't hurt relations with UK, EU WATCH LIVE: Obama speaks at roundtable with Zuckerberg MORE. One can't overstate this recruiting failure, especially after Emanuel called Madigan the "800-pound gorilla" (not usually a compliment one gives a lady) and the "most popular figure in the state of Illinois."

That loss was bad enough, but it was not the only recruiting failure surfacing for Democrats this week. Despite repeated overtures, popular South Dakota Rep. Stephanie Herseth Sandlin, who represents an at-large seat — meaning that she has been elected statewide — said no to challenging Sen. John ThuneJohn ThuneRepublicans question Trump's trip to Scotland Short-term FAA bill would likely extend into next year, GOP chairman says Civil liberties group mobilizes against surveillance amendment MORE (R).

Not to be outdone is the Empire State, where Rep. Carolyn Maloney said no to pleas from Democratic leaders to stay of out a primary against newly appointed Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandBernie Sanders’s awkward return to the Senate Protecting living organ donors' rights Overnight Finance: Senate taking up Puerto Rico bill this month | Dems attack SEC chief | House votes to limit IRS donor data MORE. Making her "no" more emphatic, Maloney announced a trump card: the support of former President Bill ClintonBill ClintonClinton slams Trump on immigration in Arizona op-ed The Trail 2016: Berning embers Poll: Most say Trump should cut business ties MORE. In other words, in the New York Democratic primary, it's game on!

With headline after headline burying the Republican Party, it's important to point out where things are going right for the party. So it must be noted that John Cornyn's team has repeatedly outraised Democrats — both in funding and in actual candidates.

There's an old saying in Washington: "When the president calls, you say yes." When it comes to candidate recruitment, however, it appears the Democrats make up the "Party of No."

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