National Party News

National Party News

Sarah Palin at Opryland: Rise of the ‘new federalism’

Sarah Palin’s speech to the Tea Party Convention at Nashville brought to my mind the Newport Folk Festival in 1963, when Doc Watson and Bob Dylan were just anybody. It was raw and unpretentious, unformed and unscripted, informal and from the heart, but the beginning of something purely original and of vast and natural willfulness which appears to just now be awakened and will not be held back.

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On the president’s meeting with Senate Democrats

Because they felt left out, Senate Democrats invited President Barack Obama to give them an opportunity to give their struggling individual campaigns a boost on national television.

Blanche Lincoln, who is down big in the polls in her home state of Arkansas, told the president, “People out there watching us, they see us nothing more than Democrats and Republicans up here fighting.”

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Sarah Palin takes $100,000 for populist Tea Party speech

When Thomas Paine wrote Common Sense, it was one of the great best-sellers in history and made a ton of money by 1776 standards. Paine donated all of the money, every penny of it, for the troops of the continental army. Sarah Palin, by contrast, gives a populist speech at a Tea Party convention, and donates the money to herself.

The word charlatan is defined as a person who practices quackery or confidence tricks in order to gain fame or money. Sarah Palin is America's leading Tea Party charlatan, in very good company with many on the Republican side of the aisle.

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Tea Party vs. GOP: The showdown

All we can focus on here in Washington today is how irritated we are by the coming 20 inches of snow and how weepy we feel over the departure of Tai Shan, our beloved panda who departs the Smithsonian National Zoo today to go back to China. OK, maybe misty is more like it.

But in Nashville, the Tea Partiers are gathering today for quite a party — their first convention. Sarah Palin, as you probably already know, is speaking. And the organizers have all been fighting with each other, since, as you probably already know, there isn't one Tea Party.

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The spinners’ composer

Back before a couple of conglomerates took over nearly all the stations with their vanilla playlists and avatar disc jockeys, radio used to have personalities who had, if you can imagine, PERSONALITIES.

They reflected the taste of their individual communities. Often bad taste, to be sure, but their banter and particularly the music they played reflected the characteristics and peculiarities of their metro areas. And no market was more peculiar than Washington.

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Bipartisanship will only help the GOP

A.B. Stoddard answers viewer questions about which party will benefit most from a show of bipartisanship, and looks at some of the president's budget plan.

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The rebirth of the Illinois GOP

Today, the president unveils his budget, which will promise the highest deficit in history. Tomorrow, voters in Illinois will traipse to the first primary of the 2010 election season.

While these events are not connected by anything other than coincidence, one will have a profound impact on the other.

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Not a partnership yet

The president and his team have a new strategy in dealing with congressional Republicans.

Mr. Obama went to Baltimore last Friday and took more than an hour of his schedule to thrust and parry with the abused House Republican minority.

And then yesterday morning, David Axelrod, the president’s top strategist, went on “Meet the Press” right before House Minority Leader John Boehner (R-Ohio) and continued the administration’s efforts to promote the new theme: The House Republicans share responsibility for the White House failures.

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Future of the Democratic majority

A.B. Stoddard talks with Pundits Blog contributors Chris Kofinis and John Feehery about what President Barack Obama needs to say in his State of the Union address and how Democrats can keep their majority in Congress.

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So, how bleak are things?

President Barack Obama and his White House team have kicked into campaign mode, bringing in their version of Dick Morris to right the ship. David Plouffe, manager of Obama's revolutionary and well-respected presidential campaign, will now head to Democratic National Committee headquarters to make sure a trusted eye is overseeing the 2010 midterm elections.

Most Democrats expect a day of reckoning this November, with a likely loss of more than 20 seats and a feared loss of 40, which would flip control to the GOP. Plouffe isn't promising anything, but he made the case that "November Doesn't Have to Be A Nightmare" in an op-ed he penned for The Washington Post over the weekend.

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