She needed a knockout blow. She didn’t get it.

He needed a knockout blow. And he did get it. At least, almost.

Look at it one way: It’s a split decision. Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaGOP rep: North Korea wants Iran-type nuclear deal Dems fear lasting damage from Clinton-Sanders fight Iran's president warns US will pay 'high cost' if Trump ditches nuclear deal MORE, as expected, won North Carolina — but by a much larger margin than expected, given his recent rocky ride with the Rev. Jeremiah Wright.

Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden slams Trump over golf gif hitting Clinton Overnight Cybersecurity: Equifax hit by earlier hack | What to know about Kaspersky controversy | Officials review EU-US privacy pact Overnight Tech: Equifax hit by earlier undisclosed hack | Facebook takes heat over Russian ads | Alt-right Twitter rival may lose domain MORE, as expected, won Indiana — but by a much more narrow margin than she wanted — or needed.

But look at it another way: It was a decisive win for Barack Obama and a disappointing showing for Hillary Clinton. To change the game, she either had to win both states, or win handily in Indiana and come close in North Carolina. She did neither.

By winning Indiana, even closely, Hillary won the right to continue her campaign through the remaining primaries, if she wants to. But the odds of her prevailing in the end now are slim to none. And it’s going to be even tougher to convince superdelegates they should stick with her and not jump on the Obama bandwagon.

Democrats have been wanting a long time, many impatiently, many prematurely, to get this primary over with. For all practical purposes, it just ended.

However much longer it takes before it’s official, we know today that Barack Obama will be the Democratic Party nominee.


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