Among its disclosures, Game Change reports the dysfunctions of the other chief characters in the 2008 campaign. Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonJeff Bridges: ‘I’m rooting’ for Trump as a human being Leading Pelosi critic Moulton once penned effusive praise for her: report Dems land top recruit for Ros-Lehtinen's Florida district MORE’s relationship with her spouse is described by Al GoreAl GoreBudowsky: Dems madder than hell Misreading lessons of an evolving electorate Manatt snags Jack Quinn MORE in the book as “an inscrutable co-dependency that coughed up chaos and melodrama in equal proportions.” Like the Gore campaign of 2000, former President Bill ClintonBill ClintonFormer WH press secretaries: End live daily press briefings Jared Kushner hires Abbe Lowell for legal team Overnight Energy: Trump White House kicks off 'Energy Week' MORE’s role has been criticized as hurting his former colleague as well as his wife.

Game Change also describes, in shocking detail, the Dorian Gray-like metamorphosis of Elizabeth Edwards: from the saintly, supportive spouse the public observed throughout Edwards’s earlier career to the abusive, nasty, intrusive character described by insiders in this book, and confirmed in The Politician by Andrew Young as a “paranoid, condescending, crazywoman.” Rudy Giuliani’s third wife hardly helped his aborted campaign. Game Change also demeans the McCain marriage, and reminds us of the charade propagated by the Republican Party and swallowed by most media of the Palin family's social highjinx, portrayed as an example of family values.

The national political stage provides a dramatic example of the importance of a positive, real, happy marriage in American politics, at a time when senators, governors (Spitzer and Sanford, for example) and local political careers were tripped up, if not destroyed, by the breach of their family commitments.


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