Sports & Entertainment

Sports & Entertainment

Understanding ‘Lost’

My kids watch a comic news report about the unfortunate spouse or family member who lives with someone who watches “Lost” and suggests survival strategies. As this astonishing concoction of soap opera, Saturday matinee, and mythical religion draws to a close, it might be worth explaining to them what is happening. This is what is going on with that: In our time, the 2000 year ages known as Platonic Months have shifted. The Age of Pisces, which began when three Zoroastrian astrologers followed a star to Bethlehem, has ended. It ended technically on January 1, 2001 and the next 2,000-year link in the 24,000 year sun cycle, the Age of Aquarius, began on that date. This is what “Lost” is about.

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Tiger, Tiger, burning bright: The agony of defeat and the emptiness of victory

It’s a little scary how often real life serves up these tidy morality plays. It almost makes you wonder if life has meaning after all.

Why bother to watch “Citizen Kane” when you can see the Masters, live and in high-definition color?
 
Day four at Augusta. Tiger bogeys three of the first five holes, then compensates with an eagle and two birdies on the next four. He is back, it seems.

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Even RNC spends money better than the Redskins

Please note the headline is only a trick to get a Redskins lamentation past the editor of this political blog … (It worked. — Ed.)

The Washington Redskins won four games last year. By the end of the season, it was painfully obvious that they were many years away from contending for a Super Bowl. Some writers, players and fans quickly forgot all about that and instantly proclaimed the Skins contenders again when they acquired Donovan McNabb earlier this week. Do not let yourself be talked into believing Donovan McNabb can turn the Redskins into a playoff contender. The trade is not a sign of progress the Redskins are making, but a sign of their continued dysfunction.

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U.S. v. Canada: ‘The greatest game in history’

Since 2002, the Winter Olympics has been becoming more interesting for two reasons. First, the high point of the Games is getting to be the two hockey games at the end, the women’s and the men’s matches. Second, that healthy competition is increasingly looked forward to as a match between Canada and the Unites States. Real rivalries tell us who we are. In 1980, in the so-called Miracle on Ice, the game between the United States and the Soviet Union claimed our identity as Cold Warriors and as European outlanders with an ancient legacy of contention. But that century and millennium is past and a new century is upon us. And if sports help tell our story, Canada today is our growing friend and competitor. As it should be with two New World countries very much alike.

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Politics, cars, golf and game shows

Either television's star is rising again or this is the final nova, exploding into the Internet black hole. It doesn't matter. Forget primetime. Stay glued to your sets for the Daytime Olympics. Or at least set your DVR.

The television spectacular began last Friday, as we cringed while watching that golf automaton mechanically recite the contrite words and phrases his advisers had programmed into him. It was eerily amazing to see how human he almost seemed to be.

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Creating jobs and Olympic gold

While I am not exactly addicted to the Winter Olympics, I have been catching snippets of NBC’s coverage at least a little bit every day.

I have been most fascinated by the diversity of the Olympics. Not the racial diversity, but the diversity in sporting events. You have curling, snowboarding, speed skating, figure skating. You have the long tracks, short tracks, the moguls, the aerials, the jumpers and everything else under the sun.

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Obama’s inappropriate interview at the Super Bowl

The Tea Party Convention in Nashville on Saturday night was funky and alive. And what a contrast to the formulaic and phony interview with President Barack Obama — a government/network joint-venture infomercial really — that Katie Couric and CBS interjected inappropriately into the Super Bowl pre-game programming.

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'Lost': The return of an American masterpiece

The best writing is in TV these days, said Glenn Close when she went to work on FX’s “Damages.” It has been so now for quite a while. Nothing surpasses “The Sopranos” in writing and dramatic imagination, and “House” regularly surpasses Hollywood movies. The star system, the technology, the exploding cars and cities yield to the more complex art of the acting troupe, in which the star is the story told, and not the muscular or snarling actor. Greater subtlety can evolve as the telling develops over time.

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A surge for Detroit?

While the national media is focused almost exclusively on the underwear bomber, another story has emanated from Washington that has captured my attention.

The Washington Wizards basketball star Gilbert Arenas is in hot water with the NBA because he brought three handguns into the Wizards’ locker room as he argued with one of his teammates over a card game. The guns were unloaded, thankfully. His teammate then brandished his own loaded gun as a response.

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The absurdity of athlete worship

From today's Washington Times:

When you have been trained to believe that you are beyond the rules of social decorum, it seems natural to act out your darker impulses. Indulging your personal vanity can be intoxicating. I suspect that Tiger Woods' sexual exploits are fairly representative of how most young men, bombarded with wealth and adulation, would act. It should not be surprising that Woods gave in to his impulses. In fact, it seems like the most human thing in the world.

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