Sarah Palin should start a 'Freedom Party'

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South Carolina’s fledgling William Wallace Caucus might suggest a prototype. She might need a council of advisers (“elders”) like John Brown’s Secret Committee of Six, which included Yankee crusader Theodore Parker and the husband of Julia Ward Howe (author of "Battle Hymn of the Republic"). 

Others to include: obviously her husband, Todd; and Franklin Graham, Christian evangelist; Texas Gov. Rick Perry, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback and maybe the venerable Judge Andrew Napolitano. She also needs a major celebratory event (think Woodstock for American revolutionaries) — I’d suggested a Tea Party Congress here are few weeks ago — to kick it off.

For the first time since the mid 1800s we hear today liberty voices rising from elected state officials including governors. But they're not in D.C.; instead they're in Kansas, Georgia, Michigan, Missouri and dozens of other states, making their own decisions on abortion, guns, constitutional law, ObamaCare, gold, currency and practically everything.

As D.C. think tanks right and left decry nullification, more and more states across the country bring challenges to the federals. But no leader yet emerges, and no center. It is, like Pirandello’s play, with actors in search of a theater and a leader.

Actually a leader is emerging: Sarah Palin. But new ideas need new forms to start again the conversation and bring in a new generation. For a fresh start, it should be distanced away from New York, D.C. and Los Angeles, which are all connected to a singular purpose. And it should leave out the decadent establishment press, described recently as “Versailles.” There is little journalism left to it, only the endless meanderings of adolescent irony, the wink and the nudge and the knowing asides of insider jokes and caustic laughter.

There are more than 30 states culturally and politically related today in the center of the country speaking with a single voice. This is American heartland. A conference or congress might be held — even, to coin a phrase, a mid-continental congress — to look toward a better and more representative future, because this is not about 2016 specifically, but the greater American future. Visiting Louisville, Ky., recently on the beautiful, historic, slow-going Ohio River, it seemed a perfect place to start again: dead center of East, West, South and the Great White North, the true center of America today as we rise in prosperity and freedom into the new millennium. 

And regarding 2016, the big Eastern establishment money and influence will all line up behind New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush (R) anyway, and this time, they will not let go. But at every event, Palin brings the crowd to its feet. As a third-party libertarian “constitutional conservative,” she could flip the establishment. Sen. Rand Paul’s (R-Ky.) filibuster suggests it is ripe for change. The Bob Dole don’t-trust-anyone-under-70 crowd and the insular Weekly Standard group, which talks so disagreeably to itself, would stay away. But Palin could take the day.