Accountability in the military

What’s missing in political Washington is any ability, or desire, to police your own. Look at how the Democrats have turned a blind eye to transgressions from folks like former Ways and Means Committee Chairman Charles Rangel (D-N.Y.). Look at how Republicans will do nothing to Joe Barton over his humiliating apologies to BP. It’s increasingly all about power, not accountability. The reason the U.S. military is the only American institution that still enjoys huge respect among the public is because they still have a sense of accountability. Criticizing the commander in chief in the press demands accountability.

Frankly, I’m a little surprised the Defense secretary didn’t deliver such accountability immediately. I could easily see Robert Gates sending a cable to Afghanistan informing McChrystal of his new civilian status, and telling him not to take military transportation back to the States. But if Gates wanted Obama to have that glory, then it was a wise choice.

I only wish now the administration would apply similar standards of accountability for its domestic programs. These agencies have their fair share of insubordinates engaging in daily activities of government malpractice. Loyalty to the president should be expected and demanded. I wish the president offered the taxpayers a similar allegiance.



Williams can be heard daily on Sirius/XM power 169, from 7 to 8 p.m. and 4 to 5 a.m.