Democrats largely cheered the Senate vote Thursday to limit filibusters while Republicans charged it was an attempt by Democrats to shift the focus away from ObamaCare.

Sen. Tom UdallTom UdallStaff shakeup begins at Dem campaign committee Tom Udall eyes NM governor bid Court ruling could be game changer for Dems in Nevada MORE (D-N.M.) said in a tweet “finally, we have reform."

In a 52 to 48 vote Thursday, the Senate approved the “nuclear option,” which changes chamber rules, and lessens the minority party’s ability to filibuster presidential nominees.

Edging toward the end of the filibuster, Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleyOvernight Energy: Fight over miners' benefits risks shutdown | Flint aid crosses finish line in House Senate sends annual defense bill to Obama's desk Dem senator: Trump’s EPA pick is ‘corruption’ MORE (D-Ore.) tweeted, will help the Senate function better.

Some Democrats circulated a graphic based on data from the Congressional Research Service that said 168 presidential nominees have been blocked in U.S. history, 82 of which happened while President Obama was in the White House.

But a slew of Republicans argued Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidReid: Comey should be investigated in wake of Russia report Spokesman: NY Times ignored Reid's comments in pre-election story on Russia Senate passes dozens of bills on way out of town MORE (D-Nev.) invoked the nuclear option to change the conversation.

Sen. Richard BurrRichard BurrTop Intel Dem: Congress 'far from consensus' on encryption Trump must be an advocate for the Small Business Administration Dems pledge to fight Sessions nomination MORE (R-N.C.) said the Senate vote will threaten bipartisanship.

“There are no rules,” Sen. John McCainJohn McCainSchumer calls for Senate probe into Russian interference Ukrainians made their choice for freedom, but now need US help White House orders intelligence report of election cyberattacks MORE (R-Ariz.) tweeted, quoting the late Sen. Arthur Vandenberg (R-Mich.) in 1949, if a majority of the Senate can change the rules at any time.

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (Fla.), chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee, applauded the move in a tweet.