Democrats largely cheered the Senate vote Thursday to limit filibusters while Republicans charged it was an attempt by Democrats to shift the focus away from ObamaCare.

Sen. Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallOvernight Energy: Dem says EPA isn't cooperating on 'privacy booth' probe | Tribe, Zinke split over border wall | Greens tout support for renewables in swing states Overnight Regulation: Facebook faces new crisis over Cambridge Analytica data | Whistleblower gets record SEC payout | Self-driving Uber car kills pedestrian | Trump bans trading in Venezuelan cryptocurrency Senate Dem: Pruitt isn’t cooperating with ‘privacy booth’ probe MORE (D-N.M.) said in a tweet “finally, we have reform."

In a 52 to 48 vote Thursday, the Senate approved the “nuclear option,” which changes chamber rules, and lessens the minority party’s ability to filibuster presidential nominees.

Edging toward the end of the filibuster, Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyBill to bolster gun background checks gains enough support to break filibuster Democrats remain skeptical of Trump’s rebuilding plan Dems to face off in Calif. nomination fights MORE (D-Ore.) tweeted, will help the Senate function better.

Some Democrats circulated a graphic based on data from the Congressional Research Service that said 168 presidential nominees have been blocked in U.S. history, 82 of which happened while President Obama was in the White House.

But a slew of Republicans argued Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidTrump presses GOP to change Senate rules Only thing Defense’s UFO probe proves is power of political favors Nevada Democrat accused of sexual harassment reconsiders retirement: report MORE (D-Nev.) invoked the nuclear option to change the conversation.

Sen. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrOvernight Cybersecurity: Senate Intel releases election security findings | Facebook to meet with officials on Capitol Hill amid Cambridge Analytica fallout | Orbitz admits possible breach Senate Intel releases summary of election security report Overnight Cybersecurity: Trump-linked data firm Cambridge Analytica attracts scrutiny | House passes cyber response team bill | What to know about Russian cyberattacks on energy grid MORE (R-N.C.) said the Senate vote will threaten bipartisanship.

“There are no rules,” Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump congratulated Putin after his national security team told him not to: report Trump faces backlash after congratulating Putin on election win McCain rips Trump's congratulatory call to Putin as an insult to Russian people MORE (R-Ariz.) tweeted, quoting the late Sen. Arthur Vandenberg (R-Mich.) in 1949, if a majority of the Senate can change the rules at any time.

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (Fla.), chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee, applauded the move in a tweet.