Democrats largely cheered the Senate vote Thursday to limit filibusters while Republicans charged it was an attempt by Democrats to shift the focus away from ObamaCare.

Sen. Tom UdallTom UdallOvernight Energy: House passes Russia sanctions deal with oil, gas fix Dem bill would ban controversial pesticide FCC chair: Trump hasn't tried to intervene on Time Warner merger MORE (D-N.M.) said in a tweet “finally, we have reform."

In a 52 to 48 vote Thursday, the Senate approved the “nuclear option,” which changes chamber rules, and lessens the minority party’s ability to filibuster presidential nominees.

Edging toward the end of the filibuster, Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleyDems don’t want to help GOP improve repeal bill OPINION | Shailene Woodley: US should run on renewable energy by 2050 Gore wishes Mikulski a happy birthday at 'Inconvenient Sequel' premiere MORE (D-Ore.) tweeted, will help the Senate function better.

Some Democrats circulated a graphic based on data from the Congressional Research Service that said 168 presidential nominees have been blocked in U.S. history, 82 of which happened while President Obama was in the White House.

But a slew of Republicans argued Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidConservative Senate candidate calls on GOP to end filibuster Ex-Reid aide: McConnell's 'original sin' was casting ObamaCare as 'partisan, socialist takeover' GOP faces growing demographic nightmare in West MORE (D-Nev.) invoked the nuclear option to change the conversation.

Sen. Richard BurrRichard BurrKushner says he did not collude with Russia, had no improper contacts Dems slam Trump for 'stonewalling' oversight efforts Burr: Nunes 'created' unmasking allegations against Rice MORE (R-N.C.) said the Senate vote will threaten bipartisanship.

“There are no rules,” Sen. John McCainJohn McCainDems don’t want to help GOP improve repeal bill GOP senator: Trump transgender ban ‘deserves more than a Twitter conversation’ Overnight Defense: Trump transgender ban sets off storm MORE (R-Ariz.) tweeted, quoting the late Sen. Arthur Vandenberg (R-Mich.) in 1949, if a majority of the Senate can change the rules at any time.

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (Fla.), chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee, applauded the move in a tweet.