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White House press secretary Jay Carney called the remarks "reprehensible" and "disappointing" at a press conference later in the day.

Massachusetts Democrats called on Brown specifically to distance himself from the comments in a statement earlier Friday. The incumbent senator is locked in a tight election battle with former Obama adviser Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenOvernight Finance: Lawmakers grill Equifax chief over hack | Wells Fargo CEO defends bank's progress | Trump jokes Puerto Rico threw budget 'out of whack' | Mortgage tax fight tests industry clout Michelle Obama is exactly who the Democrats need to win big in 2020 Wells Fargo chief defends bank's progress in tense Senate hearing MORE, who used Brown's support for the Blunt amendment - which would have allowed employers to opt out of providing coverage for health care they morally objected to - as fodder for attack ads earlier this week.

“Earlier this week, Scott Brown sided with Rick Santorum, Mitt Romney, Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntThe Hill's Whip List: Republicans try again on ObamaCare repeal Another health funding cliff puts care for millions at risk Top Senate Dem: We're going forward with understanding we can work with White House on DACA MORE, and the right wing of the Republican Party by fighting for passage of the Blunt amendment. Shortly afterwards, his party’s most prominent spokesman – Rush Limbaugh – launched into an obscene and offensive tirade against a young law student for testifying against the Blunt amendment and calling for women to have access to contraception… Scott Brown needs to decide whose side he is on, and he needs to make clear that Limbaugh’s actions are unacceptable on public airwaves," Clare Kelly, director of the Massachusetts Democratic Party, said in a statement.

Other Republicans, including House Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew Boehner‘Lone wolf’ characterization of mass murderers is the epitome of white privilege Pelosi urges Ryan to create select committee on gun violence Ex-congressman Michael Grimm formally announces bid for old seat MORE (R-Ohio) and Majority Leader Eric CantorEric CantorEric Cantor offering advice to end ‘immigration wars’ Trump's olive branch differs from the golden eras of bipartisanship After divisive rally, Trump calls for unity MORE (R-Va.) similarly denounced the comments earlier Friday.

Limbaugh, however, said Democrats were exploiting the contraception issue to scare Americans away from the Republican Party during his radio show Friday.

"The Democrats need these planks to scare voters about the Republican Party," Limbaugh said on his radio show Friday. "Contraception is the replacement plank for abortion in the Democrat Party platform. That's what's happening here in a political sense."

Daniel Strauss and Jonathan Easley contributed to the reporting of this article.