Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.) called it "a proud moment." Rep. Jared Polis (D-Colo.), the first openly homosexual member of Congress who is also a parent, thanked Obama in a tweet.

Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleyOvernight Finance: Scoop – Trump team eyes dramatic spending cuts | Treasury pick survives stormy hearing Warren burns Mnuchin over failure to disclose assets Senate Dems want Trump to withdraw from Pacific trade deal MORE (D-Ore.) called the announcement “HUGE” in a tweet. Sen. Chris CoonsChris CoonsTrump, Democrats can bridge divide to make college more affordable Senate Dems urge Sessions to abstain from voting on Trump’s Cabinet picks Booker to vote against Tillerson MORE (D-Del.) called it “a historic step.”

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandLawmakers join women's marches in DC and nationwide Women's march takes over DC Live coverage of Trump's inauguration MORE ‏ (D-N.Y.) thanked the president for his leadership on LGBT equality and later went on to ask her followers to join her in expressing their public support for the president. And Rep. Nita Lowey (D-N.Y.) said all Americans deserve to have a long and happy marriage like her own.

Democrats including Sens. Mark UdallMark UdallLive coverage: Tillerson's hearing for State The rise and possible fall of the ‘Card’ in politics Gardner's chief of staff tapped for Senate GOP campaign director MORE (Colo.) and Charles SchumerCharles SchumerDemocrats and the boycott of Trump's inauguration The Hill's 12:30 Report Why Democrats fear a successful inaugural address from Trump MORE (N.Y.), Reps. Jim Himes (Conn.) and Jackie Speier (Calif.) and mayors from D.C., Newark and New York City rushed Twitter within the first hour of the interview to add their support to Obama's position and express their own opinions.

No Republicans rushed to tweet a reaction to the news, but GOProud, a leading Republican organization that supports LGBT rights, released a statement cautiously praising Obama’s announcement.

“This is hardly a profile in courage by President Obama. For years now, President Obama has tried his hardest to have it both ways on this issue,” co-founder Christopher R. Barron said in a statement. “The real kudos here goes to LGBT activists and their allies who finally forced the President into yielding on this issue.”

Similarly, the Log Cabin Republicans slammed Obama for failing to speak out earlier, particularly prior to the referendum vote by North Carolina the previous day when voters passed an amendment defining marriage as only between a man and a woman.

“Log Cabin Republicans appreciate that President Obama has finally come in line with leaders like Vice President Dick Cheney on this issue, but LGBT Americans are right to be angry that this calculated announcement comes too late to be of any use to the people of North Carolina, or any of the other states that have addressed this issue on his watch," said Executive Director R. Clarke Cooper in a statement. "This administration has manipulated LGBT families for political gain as much as anybody, and after his campaign’s ridiculous contortions to deny support for marriage equality this week he does not deserve praise for an announcement that comes a day late and a dollar short.”

—This post was updated at 3:35 and 3:58 p.m.