Sixty-eight members of Congress have not joined Twitter, the social media platform that has become a force in politics.

Now that the majority of lawmakers, pundits, White House officials and think tanks are using Twitter with gusto in their daily messaging wars, it’s rare to find a political player who does not tweet.

But for a variety of reasons, 15 senators and 53 representatives are just saying no.

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Although a handful of congressional offices reported that they had not ruled out signing up for Twitter in the future, others deferred to a committee account rather than setting up a handle. Some said that they do not see the micro-blogging site as an effective tool to talk about policy.

And although the majority of the tweet-less lawmakers are over the age of 60, the holdouts aren’t all of the same generation. Reps. Dan Boren (D-Okla.) and Duncan Hunter (R-Calif.), for example, are both in their 30s.

Boren, who said he prefers Facebook, acknowledged he is “in the minority” among both his age group and his colleagues, but said there’s good reason to be wary of Twitter.

“I’m not big on jumping on something that doesn’t allow you to have time to think it through,” he told The Hill. “Too many people I’ve seen have sent tweets out that get them into trouble.”

But Boren also said the popularity of Twitter in Congress would have eventually persuaded him to sign up, were he not retiring this year.

Many of the lawmakers who aren’t on Twitter said they can’t communicate their positions effectively in 140 characters or fewer. 

“We just don’t see a whole lot of value in Twitter overall compared to other methods of outreach,” said Hunter’s spokesman Joe Kasper. “It might be worthwhile for updating folks on what you just ordered at the drive-through, but not communicating positions on big issues. We might come around to using it, eventually. Though we are definitely not there yet.”

A spokesman for Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer (R-Mo.) said Twitter “places too many restrictions on the kind of effective and thorough communication that he thrives on.”

Rep. Wally Herger’s (R-Calif.) office said, “Twitter does not lend itself to” thorough explanations.

And the office of Rep. Tom PetriTom PetriCombine healthcare and tax reform to bring out the best in both Overnight Tech: Internet lobby criticizes GOP privacy bill | Apple sees security requests for user data skyrocket | Airbnb beefs up lobbying Dozens of former GOP lawmakers announce opposition to Trump MORE (R-Wis.) said the lawmaker “prefers longer forms of communication.” 

“He has a website and a Facebook page, and he distributes information via email to subscribers. I can’t really imagine him tweeting, however,” said Petri’s spokesman.

Marcia Newbert, a digital strategist at the PR firm Edelman, said lawmakers are right to note Twitter’s limitations, and said the service is best used for “pulling back the curtain” on the legislative process.

“I think it probably is a unique situation for each office and they should figure out what works best for them in terms of staff resources to maintain comfort levels. … I don’t think there’s any real strategy in joining every social network just to check the box,” she said. 

“[But] people are communicating on Twitter, so if your office has the bandwidth and you’re interested in learning more or hearing more from your constituents, I think Twitter is a great way.”

The Hill looked at official congressional accounts to tally the number of lawmakers who aren't using Twitter. Had unofficial, personal accounts been included, the number of members who aren't using the service would have been lower.

Nearly a dozen of the lawmakers who shun Twitter are retiring at the end of this term. Nearly everyone in the Republican freshman class tweets, due in part to a nudge from House leaders who want the rank and file to stay connected with voters in their districts.

When the 112th Congress was sworn in last January, about 65 percent of the House and 60 percent of the Senate did not have a Twitter presence, according to Twitter’s politics team. Now that number is down to around 10 percent.

Almost all of the non-tweeting lawmakers use Facebook, and a large number who are running for reelection have a campaign presence on both networks.

“There’s so much more freedom on the campaign side,” said Vincent Harris, a GOP strategist who handled social media for the presidential campaigns of Rick Perry and Newt Gingrich.

In part due to the complicated ethics restrictions on official communication, “official accounts are boring and bland and bureaucratic,” according to Harris. “I don’t see a need for every member of Congress to have an official account ... except for perception. I don’t know why any member of Congress in 2012 would want to look like a technophobe.”

In an e-mail, Rep. Kathy Castor (D-Fla.) said, “I communicate in person, through correspondence, with two Facebook pages (official and unofficial), email updates, a website, telephone town hall conferences and community one-on-one meetings, etc. I may use Twitter in the future.”

Newbert speculated that there may be an even higher rate of Twitter use by the next Congress, when freshman lawmakers who likely will have used Twitter extensively during their campaigns arrive on Capitol Hill. 

For now, the holdouts are divided almost equally between the two parties. Sen. Jim RischJames (Jim) Elroy RischMore must be done to protect America's nuclear power plants from cyberattacks Trump feuds endangering tax reform Making cybersecurity a top priority in Congress MORE (R-Idaho) — part of the over-60 crowd — is among the few Senate Republicans still not using Twitter. Risch’s office said the senator has not ruled it out.

“He certainly sees the benefit of Twitter as a social medi[um], as demonstrated by the Usain Bolt tweets during the Olympics, but less useful as a policy discussion tool,” said spokesman Brad Hoaglun.

Twitter reported 80,000 tweets per minute sent when Bolt won gold in the 200-meter this summer, a social-media record for Olympic-related conversations. 

Political interest on Twitter has grown in the past few years, too. Twitter reported that tweets sent about the political conventions this year had sextupled the number sent about both 2008 conventions by the second evening of the Republican National Convention.

Overall, the number of adults who use Twitter on a daily basis has doubled since last May, according to a survey from the Pew Research Center released in June.

Lawmakers 
not on Twitter
 

Senate

Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteTrump voter fraud panel member fights back against critics Dems plan to make gun control an issue in Nevada Stale, misguided, divisive: minimum wage can't win elections MORE (R-N.H.)
Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusTop Lobbyists 2017: Hired Guns GOP tries to keep spotlight on taxes amid Mueller charges Clinton-Sanders tensions linger for Democrats MORE (D-Mont.)
 
Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.)

Saxby ChamblissSaxby ChamblissLobbying World Former GOP senator: Let Dems engage on healthcare bill OPINION: Left-wing politics will be the demise of the Democratic Party MORE (R-Ga.) 
Kent Conrad (D-N.D.)
Jim DeMint (R-S.C.)
Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenOvernight Tech: Senate panel subpoenaed ex-Yahoo chief | Twitter gives all users 280 characters | FBI can't access Texas shooter's phone | EU wants tax answers from Apple Week ahead: DHS nominee heads before Senate | Ex-Yahoo chief to testify on hack | Senators dig into election security Feinstein: Sessions should re-testify on Russia meetings MORE (D-Minn.)
Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandAfter Texas shooting, lawmakers question whether military has systemic reporting problem Senators push mandatory sexual harassment training for members, staff CNN to air sexual harassment Town Hall featuring Gretchen Carlson, Anita Hill MORE (D-N.Y.)

Johnny IsaksonJohn (Johnny) Hardy IsaksonCongress is working to honor America’s heroes Bipartisan lawmakers can rebuild trust by passing infusion therapy bill 24 senators co-sponsor bipartisan ObamaCare deal MORE (R-Ga.)
Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharReported pressure on CNN in Time Warner merger raises retaliation fears Dem sens demand answers over reports DOJ wanted CNN sold Ted Cruz, Debbie Dingell help Chuck Todd celebrate 70 years of 'Meet the Press' MORE (D-Minn.) 
Herb Kohl (D-Wis.)

Jim Risch (R-Idaho)

Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterDems mull big changes after Brazile bombshell No room for amnesty in our government spending bill Trump bank nominee gets rough reception at confirmation hearing MORE (D-Mont.) 
Jim Webb (D-Va.)
David VitterDavid VitterYou're fired! Why it's time to ditch the Fed's community banker seat Overnight Energy: Trump set to propose sharp cuts to EPA, energy spending Former La. official tapped as lead offshore drilling regulator MORE (R-La.)

House
 

Roscoe Bartlett (R-Md.)
 
Rob BishopRobert (Rob) William BishopOvernight Energy: GOP chairman has 'more questions' on Whitefish deal | Dems slam EPA science board changes | Industry pushes back on Perry grid plan GOP chairman has ‘more questions’ about Puerto Rico’s Whitefish Energy contract The SECURE American Energy Act only endangers public lands MORE (R-Utah)

Dan Boren (D-Okla.)

Bruce BraleyBruce BraleyOPINION | Tax reform, not Trump-McConnell feuds, will make 2018 a win for GOP Ten years later, House Dems reunite and look forward Trump: Ernst wanted 'more seasoning' before entertaining VP offer MORE (D-Iowa) 
Michael Capuano (D-Mass.)

Bill Cassidy (R-La.)

Kathy Castor (D-Fla.)

Ben Chandler (D-Ky.)

David Cicilline (D-R.I.) 
Lacy Clay (D-Mo.)

Elijah Cummings (D-Md.)

Danny Davis (D-Ill.)

Susan Davis (D-Calif.)

David Dreier (R-Calif.)

John Duncan Jr. (R-Tenn.)

Jo Ann Emerson (R-Mo.) 
Barney Frank (D-Mass.)

Rodney FrelinghuysenRodney Procter FrelinghuysenBudget vote raises red flag for GOP on tax reform WH seeks to cut back spending as disaster relief spending mounts House advances .5 billion disaster funding without offsets MORE (R-N.J.)

Scott GarrettErnest (Scott) Scott GarrettOvernight Finance: Trump repeals consumer arbitration rule | GOP scrambles on tax bill | Trump floats repealing ObamaCare mandate in tax bill | Powell told he'll be picked for Fed chair | Fed holds off on rate hike | Bank nominee gets rough reception Manufacturers increase pressure against Ex-Im nominee Garrett Trump bank nominee gets rough reception at confirmation hearing MORE (R-N.J.)

Sam GravesSamuel (Sam) Bruce GravesPrivate jet company backs Trump's air traffic control overhaul GOP signals infrastructure bill must wait House Republicans work to torpedo Trump’s air traffic control plan MORE (R-Mo.)

Ralph HallRalph HallGOP fights off primary challengers in deep-red Texas Most diverse Congress in history poised to take power Lawmakers pay tribute to Rep. Ralph Hall MORE (R-Texas)

Andy Harris (R-Md.)

Alcee Hastings (D-Fla.)

Martin HeinrichMartin Trevor HeinrichSenate panel to hold hearing on bump stocks, background checks Senators propose closing 'domestic violence loophole' after Texas shooting Week ahead: DHS nominee heads before Senate | Ex-Yahoo chief to testify on hack | Senators dig into election security MORE (D-N.M.)

Wally Herger (R-Calif.)

Duncan Hunter (R-Calif.)

Mike Kelly (R-Pa.)

Dale Kildee (D-Mich.)

Daniel Lipinski (D-Ill.)

David Loebsack (D-Iowa)

Frank Lucas (R-Okla.)

Blaine Luetkemeyer (R-Mo.)

John Mica (R-Fla.)

Jeff Miller (R-Fla.)

Ed PastorEd PastorWhich phone do lawmakers like the most? CAMPAIGN OVERNIGHT: Political tomfoolery Pastor endorses in race to replace him MORE (D-Ariz.) 
Collin Peterson (D-Minn.)

Tom Petri (R-Wis.)

Todd Platts (R-Pa.)

Nick RahallNick RahallLikely W.Va. Senate GOP rivals spar in radio appearances West Virginia is no longer Clinton country Solution needed: Rail congestion is stifling economic growth MORE (D-W.Va.)

Steven Rothman (D-N.J.)

Steve Scalise (R-La.)

Jean Schmidt (R-Ohio)

Allyson Schwartz (D-Pa.)

James Sensenbrenner Jr. (R-Wis.)

Heath Shuler (D-N.C.)

Chris Smith (R-N.J.)

Betty Sutton (D-Ohio)

Mike Thompson (D-Calif.)

Patrick Tiberi (R-Ohio)

Tim Walz (D-Minn.)

Peter WelchPeter WelchTrump talks tough but little action seen on drug prices Frustrated with Trump, Dems introduce drug pricing bill Lawmakers try again on miners’ pension bill MORE (D-Vt.)

Rob WoodallRob WoodallGOP budget chair may not finish her term Ensuring air ambulances don’t save lives only to ruin them with surprise medical bills Senators fight proposed tariffs on solar panels MORE (R-Ga.)

Bill Young (R-Fla.)

Corrections: Rep. Henry Waxman's (D-Calif.) office set up a Twitter account at the end of August. An earlier version of this story included incorrect information about Waxman's account and about the number of lawmakers not on Twitter.