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Obama's recent nominations for top positions in the administration have all been men, including Sen. John KerryJohn KerryCongress needs to assert the war power against a dangerous president Sinclair and 'Big Media': The outrage that caused the outrage Tillerson sets a lost State Department on the right course MORE (D-Mass.) to replace Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonAssange meets U.S. congressman, vows to prove Russia did not leak him documents High-ranking FBI official leaves Russia probe OPINION | Steve Bannon is Trump's indispensable man — don't sacrifice him to the critics MORE, and former Sen. Chuck HagelChuck HagelSpy agencies changed rules, making it easier to unmask members of Congress Pentagon withholding nuclear weapons inspection results: report Lobbying World MORE (R-Neb.) for secretary of Defense, a position once considered a lock for United Nations Ambassador Susan Rice. The Times predicted that "Obama’s inner circle will continue to be dominated by men well into his second term."

"I think it would be useful to wait and make judgments about this issue after the president has made the totality of appointments that he will make in the transition to a second term," White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said Wednesday, when asked about the criticism. 

Carney pointed to Obama's appointments of Janet Napolitano as the Secretary of Homeland Security, Rice as U.N. Ambassador, Kathleen SebeliusKathleen SebeliusOPINION | 5 big ideas to halt America's opioid epidemic Aligning clinical and community resources improves health Sebelius on GOP healthcare plan: 'I'm not sure what the goal is here' MORE as Secretary of Health and Human Services, and two female appointments to the Supreme Court. He also summarized the analysis by the Times, in the same article, that close to half of Obama's appointments have been women.

According to the Times:

About 43 percent of Mr. Obama’s appointees have been women, about the same proportion as in the Clinton administration, but up from the roughly one-third appointed by George W. Bush.

The photo highlighted by the Times was taken Dec. 29. Asked about that photo on Wednesday during the press briefing, Carney said it "is not reflective of the diversity within the White House staff or within the broader administration." 

Wednesday's photo captures a meeting that took place on Tuesday. It includes Obama with White House Counsel Kathryn Ruemmler, senior adviser Valerie Jarrett and Deputy Chief of Staff for Policy Nancy-Ann DeParle, as well as Deputy National Security Adviser for International Economics Mike Froman, counselor Pete Rouse, senior adviser David Plouffe, director of communications Dan Pfeiffer and Chief of Staff Jack LewJack LewTop conservative rails against ‘clean’ debt limit increase Trump mocked Obama for three chiefs of staff in three years Mnuchin wants ‘clean debt-ceiling’ bill MORE, whom the president intends to nominate as his next secretary of the Treasury.

Updated at 3:55 p.m.