Senate panel approves creation of competing Gulf oil spill commission

Senate panel approves creation of competing Gulf oil spill commission

A key Senate panel delivered a rebuke to President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaAll five living former presidents to attend hurricane relief concert Overnight Health Care: Schumer calls for tying ObamaCare fix to children's health insurance | Puerto Rico's water woes worsen | Dems plead for nursing home residents' right to sue Interior moves to delay Obama’s methane leak rule MORE on Wednesday in approving the creation of a bipartisan oil spill commission that would effectively compete with his own.


Five Democrats joined all 10 Republicans on the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee in agreeing to create a new bipartisan panel whose members would mostly be appointed by Congress.

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The proposal — offered by Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoDems lambaste Trump’s ‘outrageous’ EPA chemical safety pick Overnight Regulation: EPA misses smog rule deadline | Search is on for new HHS chief | ACLU sues over abortion pill restrictions | Justices weigh gerrymandering Price resignation sets off frenzy of speculation over replacement MORE (R-Wyo.) — would establish a commission of 10 whose members would be appointed equally by the two parties, with Obama naming the chairman and congressional leaders selecting the vice chairman and remaining eight members. The commission would have subpoena power, which the Obama-appointed panel does not.

Barrasso said the newly proposed commission — which he said is modeled after the 9/11 Commission — is needed to provide a “truly unbiased bipartisan review” of offshore drilling in the wake of the Gulf of Mexico spill. Obama’s commission “appears to me to be stacked with people philosophically opposed to offshore drilling,” Barrasso said.

In particular, Republicans have criticized the selection of Natural Resources Defense Council President Frances Beinecke, a leading critic of offshore drilling. But some Democrats raised concerns as well.

“I would suggest to my Democratic friends that if the shoe were on the other foot, and President Bush was the president and he had submitted a list of names like this to us and everyone was related to the defense of oil companies, we would say this is not fair,” Sen. Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuYou want to recall John McCain? Good luck, it will be impossible CNN producer on new O'Keefe video: Voters are 'stupid,' Trump is 'crazy' CNN's Van Jones: O'Keefe Russia 'nothingburger' video 'a hoax' MORE (D-La.) said. “And I’m saying to my colleagues this is not fair.”

But Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenHomeland Security searching some social media doesn't violate privacy The feds shouldn't blackball Kaspersky without public evidence Week ahead: Crunch time for defense bill’s cyber reforms | Equifax under scrutiny MORE (D-N.H.) added, “If there are questions about the views of the presidential commission … then I would err on the side [of] saying let’s get another point of view on the issue.”

Obama by executive order on May 21 established a commission co-chaired by former Florida Sen. Bob Graham (D) and William Reilly, a Republican who headed the Environmental Protection Agency under former President George H.W. Bush. Its official name is the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling.

The administration has halted deepwater offshore oil-and-gas drilling while the commission develops recommendations; Reilly has suggested those may not come until next year.

Barrasso’s amendment gives the new commission 180 days to develop its recommendations.

In arguing against creating a new commission, Energy and Natural Resources Chairman Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.) said Obama “appointed two outstanding individuals to chair that commission.” He called it “bipartisan and … distinguished” and said that another commission is “unlikely to shed more light on the causes of this catastrophic accident and event.” 

But Republicans not only attracted Landrieu — who often sides with Republicans in trying to balance the need to address the Gulf spill with protecting crucial oil-and-gas-industry interests in her state — but also Democrats Shaheen, Blanche Lincoln (Ark.) and Mark UdallMark UdallDemocratic primary could upend bid for Colorado seat Picking 2018 candidates pits McConnell vs. GOP groups Gorsuch's critics, running out of arguments, falsely scream 'sexist' MORE (Colo.).

“I think Sen. Barrasso made an excellent point that Congress ought to have its voice heard,” Udall told The Hill.

The bipartisan support for Barrasso’s plan “makes the case that the committee isn’t operating on a pro-forma basis; we listen to each other here,” Udall said.

But the bipartisanship shown in that panel stands in stark contrast to much of the congressional debate on how best to address the Gulf spill and future spills.

Over on the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee on Wednesday, Republicans tried, unsuccessfully, to get approval for a plan giving the president the discretion to determine whether and how much to raise an oil company’s liability cap in the event of a major oil spill.

Democrats — who outnumber Republicans 12-7 on the panel — instead easily adopted a proposal from Sen. Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezOvernight Health Care: House passes 20-week abortion ban | GOP gives ground over ObamaCare fix | Price exit sets off speculation over replacement You want to recall John McCain? Good luck, it will be impossible Poll: Most in NJ want Menendez to resign if found guilty MORE (D-N.J.) that would retroactively remove any liability cap on economic damages for BP and companies involved in future spills. Sen. David VitterDavid VitterYou're fired! Why it's time to ditch the Fed's community banker seat Overnight Energy: Trump set to propose sharp cuts to EPA, energy spending Former La. official tapped as lead offshore drilling regulator MORE (R-La.) was the lone GOP supporter of the Menendez plan.
Republicans got a sympathetic ear from the one centrist Democrat on the panel — Sen. Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusBernie Sanders flexes power on single-payer ObamaCare architect supports single-payer system Trump has yet to travel west as president MORE (Mont.).

Baucus voted against the Republican substitute from Environment and Public Works ranking member James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeA third of Congress hasn’t held a town hall — it’s time to take action Anonymous affiliate publishes claimed list of GOP private contact info Wasting America’s nuclear opportunity MORE (Okla.) but said he shares some of their concerns about removing the liability cap entirely and will try to make fixes later.