AFL-CIO to ramp up attacks on GOP ticket over Medicare, taxes

The super-PAC representing the nation’s largest labor federation intends to ramp up its efforts targeting presumptive GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney and his newly announced running mate, Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.).

AFL-CIO affiliated super-PAC Workers Voice has been an outspoken opponent of Romney’s policies for months, but on Monday the PAC promised to increase its protests against the former Massachusetts governor and Wisconsin congressman regarding their stances on Medicare and tax cuts.

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“Up to now we have had working families outside all of Romney's events protesting his outsourcing policies at Bain,” reads a PAC statement. “We're now going to expand that message to incorporate Ryan and the plan to end Medicare ... What Romney and Bain did to middle class families and companies, Romney [and] Ryan want to do to all Americans with their plan to end Medicare.”

According to the statement, “tens of millions” of Americans would lose their health insurance or become underinsured under Ryan’s budget plan. Medicaid would also be gutted and “investments in education and infrastructure would be slashed.”

The PAC also plans to stage protests at Ryan’s solo campaign events in the coming days, but has had to pivot quickly after Sunday’s announcement that Romney and Ryan will hit the campaign trail separately leading up to the Republican National Convention later this month.

In addition to an increased presence on the presidential campaign trail, the PAC plans protests at House and Senate lawmaker and candidate campaign events.

"Whether it's outsourcing American jobs or picking his running mate, Mitt Romney's proven just how bad his decisionmaking is for working people,” said AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka in a statement Saturday.

“Aligning himself with the poster-child for ending Medicare and Social Security puts to rest any suggestion that Romney has a clue what the middle class needs,” he added. “We're witnessing the radical Tea Party extremes drive its final nail in what was once the Republican Party."