Tea Party hits Clinton for support of Ex-Im

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Tea Party groups are attacking Democratic presidential frontrunner Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonFeds fight to prevent Clinton deposition in email case Trump decides he won't debate Bernie Sanders DNC opening platform process to public input MORE for her support of the Export-Import Bank, as the Congress debates a proposal to extend the embattled institution before it’s charter expires on June 30.

Freedom Partners, a Tea Party group opposing the Bank's reauthorization, began circulating video on Monday from a February 2010 hearing where Clinton testified before Congress that she wanted to "put the Ex-Im Bank on steroids.”

Ex-Im offers government-backed loans and loan guarantees for U.S. companies to help finance international business.

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"We can do even more through the Ex-Im Bank, and I'm going to try to encourage that approach," Clinton said. "I'd like to put the Ex-Im Bank on steroids because I think it does so much good work for American companies and I want American businesses to know that."

Republicans are divided about whether to reauthorize the bank. Some conservatives — including top likely and declared GOP presidential candidates like former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, Sen. Marco RubioMarco RubioFla. Senate candidate bashes Rubio The Hill's 12:30 Report Rubio: 'Maybe' would run for Senate seat if 'good friend' wasn't MORE (Fla.) and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker — oppose the bank.

They argue that the 80-year-old bank only finances projects for big businesses that have "crony" political connections inside the Beltway.

During a campaign stop in New Hampshire last month, Clinton doubled down on her support of the bank, calling Republican opposition to it "embarrassing."

James Davis, a spokesman for Freedom Partners, said, "corruption, cronyism and corporate welfare on steroids — that's what the reauthorization of the Ex-Im Bank would mean if Hillary Clinton had her way."

"What would that look like 'on steroids' in a potential Clinton administration? We're hopeful that Republicans in Congress will take that possibility off the table by allowing this bank to expire," Davis said.

It's unclear whether Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerHouse GOP faces dilemma on spending bills Overnight Finance: Puerto Rico bill clears panel | IRS chief vows to finish term | Bill would require nominees to release tax returns Overnight Defense: Pentagon chief fears sequestration's return MORE (R-Ohio) will allow for a vote on the bank, which enjoys widespread support from Democrats and moderate Republicans.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellMcConnell: Trump White House will have ‘constraints’ Nearly 400 House bills stuck in Senate limbo McConnell-allied group: We'll back Rubio if he runs for reelection MORE (R-Ky.) has said that the upper chamber will have a vote on the bank, despite his personal opposition to it.