Paul Ryan defends NATO in AIPAC speech

Paul Ryan defends NATO in AIPAC speech
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Speaker of the House Paul RyanPaul RyanPaul Ryan loves GIFs The Hill's 12:30 Report Ryan: House could pass bill that doesn't include border tax MORE (R-Wis.) offered a full-throated defense of an interventionist American foreign policy at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) conference Monday, the same day Republican presidential front-runner Donald TrumpDonald TrumpCarson calls poverty ‘a state of mind’ Arabs, Israelis and Americans share a common goal: Blocking the expansion of ISIS Poll: Americans think Trump is failing to 'drain the swamp' MORE questioned U.S. funding for NATO and said America should look out for itself.

Addressing a cheering crowd of thousands in Washington, D.C., Ryan declared, "I think we need to build a confident America. 

"And the way I see it, a confident America does not shirk our commitments or shunt aside our allies."

Without naming Trump or Sen. Ted CruzTed CruzCruz: Jokes about me in Franken's book 'obnoxious' The Hill's 12:30 Report Senate feels pressure for summer healthcare vote MORE — the other Republican presidential candidate arguing that America needs to stop intervening so much overseas — Ryan argued strongly for a traditionally hawkish foreign policy.

"I do hear people raising doubts every now and then," Ryan told the AIPAC crowd to cheers. "They say things like: 'The Middle East is a mess. It’s none of our business. Why are we involved? Why are we picking sides?' "

Trump has been making precisely this argument for months, saying the U.S. has been squandering trillions of dollars in the Middle East with no benefit to the country. 

"At what point do you say, 'Hey, we have to take care of ourselves?'" Trump asked The Washington Post editorial board on Monday.

"NATO is costing us a fortune," Trump reportedly added. "And, yes, we’re protecting Europe with NATO, but we’re spending a lot of money."

Ryan, by contrast, singled out NATO for praise, saying America made a choice after World War II to "build institutions that would foster cooperation."

"These were the years that we created NATO and GATT [the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade] and the International Monetary Fund," Ryan told the AIPAC crowd. 

"And, of course, in 1948 we were the very first country to recognize the state of Israel, just minutes after she declared independence. 

"Both the World War and the Cold War taught us that free countries are safer when we work with each other, when we stand by each other, when we trust each other — because then, when a threat arises, we can confront it together.

Ryan described the U.S.-Israel alliance as an asset, not a liability. 

"A confident America keeps its word. It stands by our allies. It stands by Israel."