Prominent Republican lobbyist lands job at Chamber of Commerce

Jack Howard, a senior Republican lobbyist at Wexler & Walker Public Policy Associates, is joining the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

Howard will work as senior vice president for congressional and public affairs, starting on July 15, for Washington’s biggest lobbying force. He will report to Bruce Josten, the Chamber’s executive vice president of government affairs.
 
“The Chamber is the premier voice of the business community here in Washington,” Howard said in a statement. “I'm honored and humbled to have been selected for this position. I'm excited to take on this next adventure in my career, and am eager to put my years of experience and lessons learned in the White House and Congress to help advance the Chamber's mission.”

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Josten said Howard “is well-respected in the halls of Congress and throughout Washington, D.C.”

“We look forward to Jack taking this demanding role to expand and strengthen the Congressional Affairs Division and the Chamber’s six regional offices to lead and support the Chamber’s advocacy function,” Josten said.

Howard has vast experience in Republican politics and policy.

He has been a senior aide to former Speakers Dennis Hastert (R-Ill.), Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) and ex-Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.). Before Howard joined Wexler & Walker in 2003, he was a deputy assistant to President George W. Bush, working in his White House’s Office of Legislative Affairs.

Joining the lobby firm in 2003, Howard was vice chairman and chief operating officer for Wexler & Walker.

The firm earned more than $7.6 million in lobbying fees last year, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. Wexler & Walker represents some prominent blue-chip clients, such as Comcast, the Nuclear Energy Institute and United Technologies.

The Chamber is Washington’s biggest lobbying spender, having spent more than $10 million last quarter, not including figures from its affiliated groups. Unlike other group's, the business lobby uses the IRS method to calculate its spending, which requires including grassroots and voter education spending in its totals.

— Megan R. Wilson contributed to this report.