Carrier union boss gets threatening calls after Trump's tweets

Carrier union boss gets threatening calls after Trump's tweets
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The Carrier union boss who criticized President-elect Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpGOP-Trump trade fight boils over with threat to cars Trump: Meetings on potential North Korea summit going 'very well' Freed American 'overwhelmed with gratitude' after being released from Venezuela MORE is receiving threatening phone calls, he told MSNBC late Wednesday. 

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Chuck Jones, president of United Steelworkers 1999, which represents workers at Indianapolis's Carrier manufacturing plant, said Trump "lied his ass off" about the terms of a deal to keep jobs in the state. 

After Trump blasted Jones in a tweet, Jones received calls from people threatening to come for him and asking what kind of car he drives, he told MSNBC, according to The Associated Press.

"Nothing that says they're going to kill me, but, you know, you better keep your eye on your kids," Jones said.

"I've been doing this job for 30 years, and I've heard everything from people who want to burn my house down or shoot me. So I take it with a grain of salt and I don't put a lot of faith in that, and I'm not concerned about it and I'm not getting anybody involved. I can deal with people that make stupid statements and move on."

Trump tweeted Wednesday that Jones had done a "terrible job representing workers." 

"No wonder companies flee country," Trump said. 

"If United Steelworkers 1999 was any good, they would have kept those jobs in Indiana. Spend more time working-less time talking. Reduce dues," Trump tweeted.

Trump tweeted after Jones said the president-elect lied about the number of jobs Carrier would keep in Indiana. 

Carrier will keep 730 jobs in Indiana, where Vice President-elect Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceIndiana middle school shooting survivors protest NRA China's fingerprints on summit's cancellation, so US must push back Trump must move beyond the art of the deal in North Korea talks MORE is governor, after receiving $7 million in tax breaks from the state, but 550 jobs will still go to Mexico. The Trump campaign originally touted that more than 1,000 jobs would stay in the U.S. 

"A lot of people at that point in time thought they were going to have a job," Jones said early Thursday on CNN. 

"They did not mention anything about 550 jobs here in Indiana going to Mexico."