Poll: 78 percent want independent Russian probe

Poll: 78 percent want independent Russian probe
© Getty Images
 
An overwhelming 78 percent of Americans believe an independent commission or special prosecutor should handle the investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election moving forward, according to a new poll.
 
The NBC NEWS/Wall Street Journal poll asked Americans whether they would rather see the an independent investigation or Congress handle the probe going forward.
 
Just 15 percent picked Congress, while 78 percent supported an independent commission or special prosecutor.
 
ADVERTISEMENT
 
The results follow a week of upheaval. President Trump fired James Comey, the head of the FBI, which is conducting one probe, on Tuesday. Since then, Trump and various members of his administration have pushed back on the need for an independent commission to continue the investigation.
 
The FBI was looking into questions of Russian interference in the election as well as whether members of Trump’s campaign colluded with Moscow.
 
Trump on Saturday confirmed he believes the investigation should go forward in “the House, the Senate, the FBI.”
 
Although polls show a partisan split when asked whether they agree with the president’s decision to fire Comey — 58 percent of Republicans approve while 66 percent of Democrats disapprove — there is strong agreement on questions of who should run the ongoing investigation. 
 
Very few Americans asked in the poll had no opinion, with low single digit responses.
 
Democrats and a few Republican members of Congress have called for an independent commission to take over the investigation, which is currently being run by the FBI and handled through the Senate Intelligence Committee.
 
Trump’s job approval rating remains at 39 percent, but 30 percent say Trump's decision to fire Comey has given them a less favorable impression of the president and 61 percent say the firing hasn't changed their opinion of the president.
 
The NBC/WSJ poll was conducted May 11 to 13 among 800 adults and it has an overall margin of error of plus or minus 3.5 percentage points.