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Squire Patton Boggs bolsters presence in Japan

Squire Patton Boggs has merged with a boutique law firm in Tokyo to extend its reach in Asia.

The five lawyers at Mamiya Law Offices will be moving into Squire’s offices in Shibuya, Tokyo. Squire Patton Boggs now has about 40 lawyers in Tokyo and 140 in the Asia Pacific region, the firm said in a release.

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Squire Sanders and Patton Boggs have shed lawyers, lobbyists and satellite offices since merging last month. The acquisition of the Asia team marks one of the first moves into expansion by the new firm.

In a release, Squire Patton Boggs said the combination is part of a longtime relationship with the head of the smaller firm.

“Not only do we share a number of major public institutional clients, but there are synergies with our financial services and intellectual property practices in Tokyo, which will lead to new and exciting opportunities in Japan as well as elsewhere around the world,” said Ken Kurosu, Squire Patton Boggs’s Asia regional coordinator and the head of the Tokyo office.

Squire’s move to bolster its presence in Japan — a country that is trying to reach a trade deal with the U.S. — includes bringing on Kenji Funahashi from Jones Day and Hiroki Suyama from Pillsbury, who each joined the firm’s Los Angeles office last month.

Steve Mahon, a global managing partner at Squire, noted Mamiya’s speciality in corporate and securities law.

Founded in 2008, Mamiya Law Offices “specializes in domestic and international transactions, including M&A, corporate governance, corporate restructuring and reorganizations, joint ventures, private equity, securities, together with expertise in international trade, litigation and international arbitration.”

Jun Mamiya, the head of Mamiya Law Offices, said it would be able to “offer clients considerable added value and leverage our presence to support our clients on significant international projects.”  

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