Dent joins law firm to advise on policy

Dent joins law firm to advise on policy
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While Dent is unable to lobby for one year after leaving Congress due to federal ethics rules, he will be joining the firm’s government affairs practice as a senior policy adviser, working out of its Washington and Philadelphia offices.
 
The prominent Republican worked in Congress since 2005, serving as co-chairman of the moderate Tuesday Group and chairing the House Ethics Committee from 2015 to 2017. He also served on the House Appropriations Committee.
 
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Dent stepped down from his position in May, leaving Congress early after opting not to run for reelection.
 
“I'm sure I will be doing more than one thing, several things. You can say that pretty safely," Dent, who recently signed with CNN as a contributor, told reporters last month.
 
It is relatively common for exiting members of Congress to end up on K Street. While some become registered lobbyists, others are more involved with public relations.
 
A large number of former lawmakers act as consultants who advise clients on policy without engaging in any advocacy.
 
“When the time comes I’m going to evaluate that, but I’m not against the idea of advocating for issues and clients that I believe in,” Dent told The Philadelphia Inquirer on Wednesday, regarding whether he will become a lobbyist.
 
“I expect to use my expertise and experience in a way that will be helpful to people who have a difficult time figuring out how our government works.”
 
DLA Piper, which has offices all around the world, earned nearly $8 million in lobbying revenue in 2017. Its advocacy clients include Philadelphia-based Comcast, Discover Financial Services, Apple, AARP and Booz Allen Hamilton.
 
Dent, in particular, has a “deep understanding of Congress and a range of international and domestic issues,” Ignacio Sanchez, the head of DLA Piper’s government affairs practice, said in a statement on Wednesday. Sanchez also lauded Dent for having “many strong relationships with elected officials from both parties.”
 
 
The president was “a factor, but not the factor” in his decision to retire, Dent said.