Lawmakers defeat journalists in trivia contest

Lawmakers got their revenge for any bad press they might have received when they defeated some of D.C.’s brightest journalists in a political trivia contest Thursday night.

The four politicians — Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownThe Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — GOP lawmakers race to find an immigration fix Warren to put hold on Trump consumer bureau nominee Stop labeling babies as 'born addicted' — it stigmatizes them and is inaccurate MORE (D-Ohio), Sen. Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyAction by Congress is needed to help victims of domestic violence Poll: Casey holds double-digit lead over Barletta in Pa. Senate race Ivanka Trump to press Senate on vocational training bill MORE Jr. (D-Pa.), Rep. Mark KirkMark Steven KirkThis week: Trump heads to Capitol Hill Trump attending Senate GOP lunch Tuesday High stakes as Trump heads to Hill MORE (R-Ill.) and former Rep. Tom Davis (R-Va.) — came from behind to eke out a 10-point win at The Hotline’s Political Pursuit event.

The “Members Only” team of lawmakers faced off against the Broadcast News team, consisting of CNN’s Dana Bash, NBC’s Chuck Todd, ABC’s Jonathan Karl and Fox News Channel’s Molly Henneberg; and an “Old School” team of print reporters — Bloomberg’s Al Hunt, The Washington Post’s Chris Cillizza, The Washington Times’s Christina Bellantoni, and The Wall Street Journal’s Sue Davis.  

The “Members Only” team trailed badly in the beginning but made up enough ground to win with 290 points to the “Broadcast News’” team's 280. The “Old School” team came in third with 220 points.

The political-friendly questions helped. For example, Kirk, who is rumored to be a 2010 Senate candidate, was easily able to answer what year Roland Burris lost the Democratic Senate nomination to Paul Simon: 1984.

And Davis knew the Peking Gourmet Inn (in his old congressional district) was President George H.W. Bush’s favorite Chinese restaurant.

Cheering on the “Members Only” team were Sens. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillSenate moderates hunt for compromise on family separation bill Election Countdown: Family separation policy may haunt GOP in November | Why Republican candidates are bracing for surprises | House Dems rake in record May haul | 'Dumpster fire' ad goes viral Hillicon Valley: Verizon, AT&T call off data partnerships after pressure | Tech speaks out against Trump family separation policy | T-Mobile, Sprint make case for B merger MORE (D-Mo.) and Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharDemocrats protest Trump's immigration policy from Senate floor The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — GOP lawmakers race to find an immigration fix America has reason to remember its consumer protection tradition when it comes to privacy MORE (D-Minn.).

McCaskill, one of the most prolific lawmakers on the social networking site Twitter, Tweeted several times during the event and even posted a photo of the contestants.

And when Brown spotted her in the audience, he joked "Claire's going to Tweet us the answers." (For the record, she didn’t.)

McCaskill claims to get 500 to 600 responses from her followers a day. But three people won't follow her — her kids.

McCaskill told The Hill her son and two daughters don't mind her Internet use but they don't want to be a part of it.

"They won't let me look at their Facebook pages," she said.

McCaskill has been vocal about encouraging other lawmakers to join her online. She argues it's a great way to communicate directly with constituents, even if the short, often pithy, posts cause a controversy.

The freshman lawmaker admits she enjoys it when her postings cause a sensation.

"I love it," she said. "I love that it's out there."