Bill of the week: The Josh Miller Helping Everyone Access Responsive Treatment in Schools (HEARTS) Act

Bill of the Week, a new feature in The Hill, highlights a recently introduced piece of legislation that might not make front-page news but otherwise catches the eye.

Title: The Josh Miller Helping Everyone Access Responsive Treatment in Schools (HEARTS) Act

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Number: S. 2106

Sponsor: Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod BrownDems push for more action on power grid cybersecurity Senate Banking panel huddles with regulators on bank relief Overnight Regulation: Labor groups fear rollback of Obama worker protection rule | Trump regs czar advances in Senate | New FCC enforcement chief MORE (D-Ohio)

Co-sponsors: Sens. Mark BegichMark BegichPerez creates advisory team for DNC transition The future of the Arctic 2016’s battle for the Senate: A shifting map MORE (D-Alaska), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandBipartisan senators seek to boost expertise in military justice system Mattis gaining power in Trump’s Cabinet What do Democrats stand for? MORE (D-N.Y.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill's 12:30 Report Poll: One-third blame media for political violence Sanders's wife hires lawyer amid bank fraud investigation MORE (I-Vt.)

Date introduced: Feb. 14

Summary: This bill would authorize the Education secretary to award grants to local educational agencies to buy Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) and provide funds to train teachers and staff in using AEDs and CPR. The program’s goal would be to treat heart-attack victims while waiting on emergency personnel to arrive. The legislation would require schools to provide $1 of private funding for every $3 of federal funding received through the program.

Bill’s origin: Brown introduced the bill to honor an Ohio high school football player who died from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) during a game in 2000.  Josh Miller, after whom the bill is named, never experienced heart problems before he died of SCA at the age of 15.  In a press release, Brown said, “Automatic external defibrillators are easy to use — and can mean the difference between life or death during the onset of sudden cardiac arrest.”

What others say: Sudden Cardiac Arrest Coalition President Mary Newman noted the importance of acting quickly when dealing with heart attack victims, saying, “Even the best EMS services can’t arrive before a bystander.” 

Newman said more than 380,000 people have a sudden cardiac arrest each year, and approximately 1 in 10 survive.

Bill’s history: Rep. Betty Sutton (D-Ohio) introduced the Josh Miller HEARTS Act in April 2011 for a third time, after it passed the House in two previous Congresses only to be killed in the Senate. Former Sens. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) and George Voinovich (R-Ohio) introduced the two previous companion bills in the Senate.

Extras: According to the Lansing State Journal, a Michigan high school basketball player who collapsed and died after making a game-winning shot in March 2011 was inducted into his school’s sports hall of fame earlier this month. Wes Leonard was a 16-year-old player for the Fennville Blackhawks. After being rushed to the hospital, he died from sudden cardiac arrest due to an enlarged heart.

To suggest a Bill of the Week, email Kris Kitto at kkitto@thehill.com.