A party hostess

Juleanna Glover is a lobbyist with The Ashcroft Group. This week she is in Portsmouth, N.H., to volunteer for Sen. John McCain’s (R-Ariz.) presidential campaign. She is the former spokeswoman to Vice President Dick Cheney and also worked for Vice President Dan Quayle. She often holds book parties in her Kalorama home and has hosted soirees for everyone from the former Wonkette (aka Ana Marie Cox) to The Washington Post’s Gil Troy.

You are known around town for hosting some of the most interesting parties at your home. You just held one for Garrett Graff, of Washingtonian magazine, and will soon throw another for Dana Milbank of The Washington Post. How did you get yourself into this party-host role?

I spend a lot of time working and I have three little kids. If there is any way for me to be home for them, it’s always a preference for me to have people over than find a babysitter for them. I’m the venue and I help put together the invitation list.

What is it you like about hosting D.C. political-minded parties?

Washington has some spectacularly interesting, quirky personalities, and it’s always fascinating to mix the various constituencies, [like] political reporters, consultants, political aides and academics.

What don’t you like?

Everything one does to put these parties together can be an awful amount of work. I’m honored that people would show up to my home for these things. It’s always worth the tradeoff.

Have any fights ever every broken out in your home — and by fights, I don’t mean fistfights, but intellectual arguments?

Lots of times. The war in Iraq is always a heated topic of discussion. I would say that religion in any context is often controversial.

Any memory in particular?

In terms of fights breaking out, there’s not a lot of belligerence. There’s a lot of sidesplitting polarity … For instance, Jim Angel can do some of the best political impersonations in the business. It’s just absolutely hysterically funny.

Who is the most famous person you have ever hosted in your home?

I’d say John McCain and Vice President Cheney.

Given that many members of Congress want to impeach Cheney, what do you, as his former spokeswoman, say to the negative impression many seem to have of him?   

The vice president is certainly one of the most impressive and formidable political figures for whom I’ve had the pleasure of working. I think history would describe him as one of our great political figures.

So you disagree with what people are saying?

Yes, absolutely. I think the vice president is one of the most capable and wise public servants in government today. He’s also got a sublime sense of humor and sense of self-deprecation. I think no matter what your opinion of Dick Cheney, anyone with an understanding of the political system can do nothing but respect him.

You still sound like his spokeswoman.

I would jump back in to help him at any point and time. He’s one of the people whom I most admire.

What do you think of your status in Washington? Not everyone is on Wikipedia, you know.

My previous roles have always been in media relations. I think that just drives Google hits, for what that’s worth. Any major spokesperson has a footnote on the Internet.

You say for what it’s worth. Do you not think that is worth much?

I think it’s a function of the fact that I’ve worked for some very accomplished prominent individuals, including John Ashcroft.

Which leads me to my next question. What do people not know about former Sen. John Ashcroft (R-Mo.) that you think people ought to know? You did, after all, serve as his senior adviser.

He plays a mean game of basketball and he’s prone to an occasional hokey pun.

You also worked on former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani’s Senate exploratory committee. Do you think he still has a chance of winning the presidency after blowing off Iowa?

First of all, I’m supporting McCain and I have been for the past 15 months. Giuliani is a great leader and McCain is likely to do very well in New Hampshire. It’s too early to predict what will happen in South Carolina, Florida and Michigan.

Yes, you are an avid supporter of the Arizona GOP senator. Do you think his temper problems could hurt him?

I don’t think he has temper problems. I think he’s passionate and he has strongly held opinions. I’d leave it at that.

Where did you grow up?

Fairfax, Va.

Have you always enjoyed attending parties?

There’s a difference between work parties and personal parties. Everyone in Washington has to do a lot of parties for business purposes. Those are inevitably less fun than parties with personal friends.

Do you prefer to throw parties or attend them?

On the whole, I prefer to put my kids to bed every night I’m in town. I’m happy to be among friends and acquaintances as long as I get to put my kids to bed before anything.

You’re a redhead and I’ve heard you have great red lipstick. What brand is it?

I have some ancient Ultima that is probably 14 years old. I use it for parties on occasion. The label is gone. I’m not even sure if it’s healthy to use lipstick that old.

What do you do about party crashers?

I’ve never thought about it. There are always new folks at my parties. People bring guests. It’s always interesting to meet new personalities in Washington. It has not been a problem I’ve had to address.

What do you like to serve?  

[I order from] Sushi Express, Shemalis and Costco.
 
What’s the worst party you’ve ever attended?

I’m kind of hard-pressed to come up with that. We’re talking over a lengthy period of time. [One evening], my 7-year-old had a sleepover with 14 children spending the night. That evening I got no sleep. I must have been insane.

The best?

The best is [Washington Times reporter] Kevin Chafee’s party at a farm in Middleburg, Va. They had the best Latin band and it was an assortment of some of the most interesting D.C. personalities and [people from the] international community, and it was just an all-out blast. The venue was gorgeous.

Who is your favorite designer to wear to your parties?

Anything from Filene’s Basement.



To recommend a political personality for 20 Questions, call Betsy Rothstein at (202)628-8516 or email at betsyr@thehill.com