Portrait of the 113th Congress

There will be over 90 new members of Congress sworn into office on Thursday — a diverse group of men, women, straight, gay, married, single, well-known and unknown.

The freshman class of 2013 includes an animal vet (Republican Ted YohoTed YohoGOP bill would block undocumenteds from military service It is time for a paradigm shift in U.S. foreign aid Clash in GOP over Zika funding MORE of Florida), a reindeer farmer (Republican Kerry BentivolioKerry BentivolioIndiana Republican: Leaders duped me Reindeer farmer saves 'cromnibus' with yes vote High drama as .1T spending package advances by one vote MORE of Michigan), a scion of a legendary family (Democrat Joseph Kennedy of Massachusetts), a famous twin (Democrat Joaquin Castro of Texas, whose brother gave the keynote address at the Democratic National Convention), and several unfamiliar faces that will be popping up on C-SPAN in the weeks to come.

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Lawmakers will take the oath of office at noon, as constitutionally mandated.

In the Senate, after the official swearing-in, Vice President Biden will host ceremonial reenactments for individual senators in the Old Senate Chamber.

Joining the 12 newly elected members of the upper chamber — three Republicans, eight Democrats and one Independent — will be Republican Tim ScottTim ScottDemocrats have a long way to go before they can tout their Hill diversity Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Senate condemns Dallas attack on police MORE, the South Carolina House member who was appointed to fill the seat of Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.), who resigned this month.

In the House, there will be a roll call vote at 11 a.m. for new members and the swearing-in at noon, followed by a ceremonial swearing-in in the Rayburn House Office building at 3 p.m., which is where new members will get their photo taken with Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerClinton maps out first 100 days The Hill's 12:30 Report Boehner on Cruz: 'Lucifer is back' MORE (R-Ohio).

The lower chamber will gain 82 new lawmakers on Thursday: 35 Republicans and 47 Democrats.

This year’s Republican freshman class is much smaller than the legendary class of 2010, which caused many headaches for BoehnerJohn BoehnerClinton maps out first 100 days The Hill's 12:30 Report Boehner on Cruz: 'Lucifer is back' MORE.

Republican Luke Messer of Indiana, who was elected president of the incoming freshmen, said he found a way to rein in his colleagues.

“I got a lot of accolades from classmates because at our first meeting I established a rule where everyone could talk but no one could talk more than two minutes, so our first meeting took 18 minutes and everybody was very happy,” he said this past weekend on C-SPAN’s “Newsmakers.”

The lower chamber also is losing some of its best-known members after Thursday: Reps. Barney Frank (D-Mass.), Ron Paul (R-Texas) and Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio) are leaving.

But there will be some familiar faces returning to Capitol Hill — nine incoming House members have served in the lower chamber before: Republican Matt SalmonMatt SalmonLGBT fight dooms spending bill on House floor A hearing brought to tears over Right to Try legislation Time for national Right to Try legislation MORE of Arizona, Democrat Ann KirkpatrickAnn KirkpatrickThe Trail 2016: Words matter Top Dem Senate hopefuls to skip convention GOP campaign chief: Trump won't cost us the House MORE of Arizona, Democrat Alan GraysonAlan GraysonDem super-PAC to launch ads backing Murphy in Florida GOP senators lead in key swing states Dem rep tells Trump to ‘shut the f--- up’ over Ginsburg criticism MORE of Florida, Democrat Bill FosterBill FosterDiversity of House GOP at risk in 2016 election Lawmakers celebrate Jackie Robinson Day Overnight Energy: Fight breaks out over Interior budget MORE of Illinois, Democrat Rick Nolan of Minnesota, Democrat Carol Shea-Porter of New Hampshire, Democrat Dan Maffei of New York, Democrat Dina Titus of Nevada and Texas Republican Steve StockmanSteve StockmanCruz will skip State of the Union Ethics: Lawmakers didn’t ‘knowingly’ break rules with Azerbaijan gifts Lawmakers deny knowledge of secret funding for 2013 trip MORE.

Shea-Porter said knowing fellow lawmakers was one of the biggest advantages of her previous service.

"The advantages of two terms already served are experience, perspective and established relationships. I really can't see any disadvantages!" she told The Hill in a statement.

And some of the incoming freshmen have unfamiliar faces but familiar last names.

Joseph Kennedy of Massachusetts returns the Kennedy name to Congress after a four-year absence and replaces another famous name in the process: Barney Frank.

Democrat Donald Payne Jr. of New Jersey took the seat of his father: the late Rep. Donald Payne (D-N.J.).

And Democrat Dan Kildee of Michigan replaces his uncle, retiring Rep. Dale Kildee (D-Mich.).

Several former congressional aides are joining their former bosses as colleagues: Messer worked for three former members and for the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee; Republican Rodney Davis of Illinois worked for longtime Rep. John Shimkus (R-Ill.); and Republican Andy BarrAndy BarrHorse racing industry divided on need for federal oversight Lawmakers press for Christians to be included in ISIS genocide designation Rein in thoroughbred racing abuses MORE of Kentucky worked for former Rep. Jim Talent (R-Mo.).

In the Senate, four women were added to the ranks, making a total of 20 in the upper chamber — four Republicans and 16 Democrats  — a new record.

Democrat Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren hammers Trump at Latino event Trump tries to stoke liberal anger at Kaine pick Clinton VP pick could face liberal ire MORE comes in as one of the most well-known names. Her Senate race, in which she defeated incumbent Sen. Scott Brown (R-Mass.), garnered national attention. Ironically, Warren could end up working with Brown anyway. Fellow Massachusetts Sen. John KerryJohn KerryPower restored at Turkish air base used in anti-ISIS fight Don't expect much of a post-convention bounce for Trump or Clinton Kerry: Power at Turkish air base to be restored shortly MORE (D-Mass.) is President Obama’s nominee for secretary of State and Brown is seen as a strong contender for his seat should Kerry be confirmed and Brown decide to run.

Democrat Tammy BaldwinTammy BaldwinNBA pulls All-Star Game from NC over bathroom law Mike Pence out-of-touch with New Midwest Senate Dems push Obama for more Iran transparency MORE of Wisconsin is the first openly gay person elected to the upper chamber, although she has downplayed the historic aspect of her election.

“I didn’t run to make history. I ran to make a difference,” she wrote on her Twitter account on election night.

Six of the newly elected senators are from the House, meaning a majority of the upper chamber will be made up of former members from the lower chamber: Fifty-two of them have previous House service, according to the Senate Historical Office.

Those include Arizona Republican Jeff FlakeJeff FlakeVulnerable GOP senators praise Kaine GOP Sen. Flake offers Trump rare praise Booker denounces ‘lock her up' chants MORE and Democrats Chris MurphyChris MurphyOvernight Healthcare: Mysterious new Zika case | Mental health bill in doubt | Teletraining to fight opioids Hopes dim for mental health deal Senators push tougher sanctions against Iran MORE of Connecticut, Mazie HironoMazie HironoOvernight Finance: Senate sends Puerto Rico bill to Obama | Treasury, lawmakers to meet on tax rules | Obama hits Trump on NAFTA | Fed approves most banks' capital plans Senate Dems pledge to keep fighting over Zika Senators to Obama: Investigate whether Pentagon misled Congress MORE of Hawaii, Joe DonnellyJoe DonnellyOvernight Finance: Senate punts on Zika funding | House panel clears final spending bill | Biz groups press Treasury on tax rules | Obama trade rep confident Pacific deal passes this year Overnight Healthcare: Lawmakers leave for summer without approving new Zika funds Dems block defense spending bill for second time MORE of Indiana, Martin HeinrichMartin HeinrichWeek ahead: Republicans dig into FCC agenda Dem senators blast ‘sprawling’ expansion of spy power Overnight Cybersecurity: Questions linger after Clinton email probe MORE of New Mexico, and Baldwin.

Of the nearly 2,000 men and women who have served in the Senate since its inception in 1789, 31 percent — a total of 606 — first served in the House, according to an analysis from the University of Minnesota.

There are some advantages to having previous congressional experience.

“I know where the bathrooms are,” Flake joked to The Hill.

Flake was referring to a common problem for freshmen — the Capital complex is a maze of hallways, staircases and tunnels that rivals Hogwarts. Most incoming members spend their first few weeks simply trying to learn their way around.

Turning serious, Flake noted, “It helps to have some experience, but the Senate is a different body and there’s a lot to learn.”

But he got an early start, crossing through the Capitol’s Statuary Hall and ornate rotunda over the past few weeks to attend the Senate Republican Conference’s weekly lunches.

“It’s better food over there,” Flake said. “I know that.”