The Hill's 50 Most Beautiful People: Page 3 of 50

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Age: 24
Hometown: Tallahassee, Fla.
Political party: Republican
Relationship status: Boyfriend

Kristen Callaway is a Tallahassee girl with a taste for the cosmopolitan. She grew up playing soccer in Florida’s state capital, which she says feels a lot more like southern Georgia, and even went to church with Bobby Bowden, Florida State University’s legendary football coach.

These days Callaway, a legislative assistant to Rep. Steve Southerland (R-Fla.), likes to visit Manhattan on the weekend to stroll through Central Park or go clubbing in the Meatpacking District with her boyfriend of five years. Her dream is to live in London for a year or two. She studied there for a semester in college and says it feels safer and cleaner than the Big Apple.

She lives in southeast Washington, a few blocks from the Nationals’ ballpark. Callaway likes to invite friends over to go to games but wouldn’t call herself a baseball fan.

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“Who’s the guy who’s 19?” she says when asked about her favorite player.

Kristen grew up Southern Baptist and says religion still has a big influence on her life.

“Faith is what motivated me to get into politics,” she says. She’s happy to work for a boss who she says cares about the poor, noting that the congressman is part of a conservative anti-poverty initiative with the Heritage Foundation.

In her free time she likes to hang out with friends and shop, the latter “probably more than I should,” she says with a laugh.

Her dad is a longtime transportation lobbyist who worked for former Rep. Clay Shaw (R-Fla.), and she’s following in his footsteps by handling transportation issues as part of her portfolio.

She’s looking forward to getting away to Europe during the August recess. Her boyfriend surprised her by planning a weeklong trip to Spain and Italy, stopping at Valencia, Florence, Rome and Corsica.

“I’m so thrilled!” she says.

She’s also thrilled that Congress finally struck a deal on the transportation authorization bill and her work hours can return to normal.

— Alexander Bolton

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