A moveable feast

Washington’s sushi scene is dominated by a handful of famed culinary temples, like the classic Sushi Taro or the inventive Kaz Sushi Bistro.

Washington’s sushi scene is dominated by a handful of famed culinary temples, like the classic Sushi Taro or the inventive Kaz Sushi Bistro.

Two newcomers are unlikely to knock the sushi-joint royalty off their lofty perches, but they do make for fun younger siblings. What makes them welcome additions is their new-to-Washington method of delivery: Conveyor belts, popularized in the kaiten (or rotating) sushi bars of Japan and later on the West Coast, parade dishes before customers’ eyes, like a menu come to life.

Customers need only to pluck the dish they want from the passing display, a presentation method perfectly suited to a quick meal. It also creates a high-energy vibe and not a little friendly competition among customers who may be eyeing the same dish. Less adventurous eaters, too, may be enticed to try dishes they wouldn’t ordinarily — it’s akin to being able to order an entire meal from a dessert cart.

A few steps into Wasabi, just off Farragut Square, and there are plenty of hints that a fun night awaits. Groups of friends gather over Sapporos and survey the colorful dishes winding their way through the dining room. Stylish d