After Cain’s song, senators decline to belt out a tune

While Herman Cain has no problem carrying a tune in public, don’t expect lawmakers to break into song mid-press conference.

The GOP presidential candidate, after denying allegations of sexual harassment while he was the head of the National Restaurant Association, accepted an invitation by National Press Club President Mark Hambrick to end his Monday visit there “on a high note.”

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The former Godfather’s Pizza CEO said, after clearing his throat, “It is demanding enough to speak a dozen times a day, let alone to then also have to sing.” He added that singing was an opportunity to “share a little bit of my faith,” before he serenaded the audience with a hymn called “He Looked Beyond My Fault and Saw My Need.”

Cain isn’t the first politician to croon in front of the cameras. Sen. Tom CoburnTom Coburn-trillion debt puts US fiscal house on very shaky ground Al Franken: 'I make fun of the people who deserved it' The more complex the tax code, the more the wealthy benefit MORE (R-Okla.) settled a wager on a college football game in 2009 against Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonSenate panel approves bill to speed up driverless cars Dems plan to make gun control an issue in Nevada Overnight Cybersecurity: Trump proclaims 'Cybersecurity Awareness Month' | Equifax missed chance to patch security flaw | Lawmakers await ex-CEO's testimony | SEC hack exposed personal data MORE (D-Fla.) with a warbling rendition of “Rocket Man.” But senators told ITK on Tuesday that there wouldn’t be any more sing-offs any time soon in the upper chamber.

Sen. John BoozmanJohn Nichols BoozmanThe Hill's Whip List: Republicans try again on ObamaCare repeal GOP senator undergoing follow-up surgery next week An unlikely home in DC MORE exclaimed, “I have a very different personality than Herman Cain.” The Arkansas Republican then made a campaign promise (of sorts), saying, “In fact, people have asked me to promise never to burst out in song, period.” That declaration might be music to his family’s ears. Boozman explained that his wife and three daughters would be “mortified” if Dad were attempting to exercise his vocal cords in front of a crowd.

Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainRubio asks Army to kick out West Point grad with pro-communist posts The VA's woes cannot be pinned on any singular administration Overnight Defense: Mattis offers support for Iran deal | McCain blocks nominees over Afghanistan strategy | Trump, Tillerson spilt raises new questions about N. Korea policy MORE (R-Ariz.) evidently feels the same way. Asked if he would sing if it would attract some votes, the senior senator replied with a smile, “Well, I’ve gotten pretty desperate. If I broke into song I think it would probably turn the tide in my opponents’ direction.”

The Cardin family has been graced with the sounds of Sen. Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinOvernight Cybersecurity: Equifax CEO faces outraged lawmakers | Dem presses voting machine makers on cyber defense | Yahoo says 3 billion accounts affected by 2013 breach Key Dem: Did Kushner use private emails to talk with foreign governments? Dem senator pitches ideas for gun control after shooting MORE’s voice — the Maryland Democrat says he’s been known to sing Kingston Trio and Peter, Paul and Mary classics now and then. But Cardin says his versions of old-time hits are mostly done behind closed doors: “I think there’s a limit to what I think is appropriate in trying to persuade people to vote. It doesn’t mean you don’t show your personality, don’t show other sides of you. I think you need to do that. So I’ll let the public judge whether [Cain’s song] was appropriate or not.”

But Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillKoch-backed group targets red-state Dems on tax reform Overnight Cybersecurity: Equifax security employee left after breach | Lawmakers float bill to reform warrantless surveillance | Intel leaders keeping collusion probe open Las Vegas highlights Islamist terrorism is not America's greatest domestic threat MORE (D-Mo.), who is up for reelection in 2012, indicated it was perhaps better to keep her mouth shut, blurting out, “Oh, boy, I’m not going there!”