Message to Rep. Young: No finger-pointing on House floor!

Rep. Don YoungDonald (Don) Edwin YoungPension committee must deliver on retirement promise Our leaders must end the hate before they burn America down Alaska rep denies suggesting armed Jews could have prevented Holocaust MORE (R-Alaska) cannot do anything these days without getting himself into trouble — not even when he’s speaking about the obscure National Scenic Designation Act on the House floor.

During last week’s floor debate, in which he was opposed by Democratic Reps. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyDem senator: I support 'real' Second Amendment, not 'imaginary' one Frustrated Trump wants action on border wall, immigration Michigan Dem: Detroit-style pizza 'sweeping the nation' MORE (Conn.) and Raúl Grijalva (Ariz,), Young pointed his finger to his colleagues across the aisle and declared, “New England needs energy. That side of the aisle, not only the side of the aisle in the House but also in that other body …”

Rep. Stephen Lynch (D-Mass.), sitting in the Speaker’s chair, interrupted and scolded him: “The gentleman will please direct his remarks to the chair.”

Young asked, “What did I say wrong?”

Lynch: “The gentleman pointed to the other side.”

Young grew agitated and warned, “I will point to you next time.”

 The Alaskan lawmaker apparently can’t win. The following day he opened a legal defense fund. Young is under FBI investigation for possible corruption.



Sen. Schumer: Post-meal yawns, or low blood sugar?

After keeping reporters waiting for a 12:15 p.m. press conference last week, Sens. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerSchumer: GOP efforts to identify FBI informant 'close to crossing a legal line' Patients deserve the 'right to try' How the embassy move widens the partisan divide over Israel MORE (D-N.Y.), Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidMcConnell not yet ready to change rules for Trump nominees The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by CVS Health — Trump’s love-hate relationship with the Senate Trump to press GOP on changing Senate rules MORE (D-Nev.), Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinThis week: House GOP regroups after farm bill failure Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — Trump hits federally funded clinics with new abortion restrictions Dem lawmaker spars with own party over prison reform MORE (D-Ill.) and Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayOvernight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — Trump official won't OK lifetime limits on Medicaid Dems warn against changes to federal family planning program Overnight Health Care: Drug company under scrutiny for Michael Cohen payments | New Ebola outbreak | FDA addresses EpiPen shortage MORE (D-Wash.) took their seats in the Capitol’s Mansfield Room about 15 minutes late and joked about having had a nice lunch.

“Next week — lobster tail,” Schumer joked. “The more we eat, the better we think.”

As the press conference wore on, Schumer seemed to be hit with the post-lunch need for a nap.

While Reid explained the Senate’s strategy on the economic stimulus package, Schumer yawned and checked his cell phone.

Then, he apparently gave the yawns to his leader.

Trying to be discreet, Reid covered his mouth and yawned while Durbin spoke. At least one person in the audience was caught yawning, too.

But rather than suffering from digestive sluggishness, Schumer was apparently in need of a meal.

Schumer spokesman Brian Fallon remarked that the senator’s lobster tail joke was “probably just a one-liner,” since he had not in fact come from lunch before the conference and was running to a committee hearing and a policy lunch after.



Sighting: Forest Whitaker steps up for Obama

Academy Award-winning actor Forest Whitaker and wife, Keisha, gushed over the presidential prospects of Sen. Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaThe true commander in tweet Meghan Markle's pre-royal 'finishing lessons' and an etiquette of equality Hannity on Acosta claim he was tough on Obama: 'Only thing missing were the pom-poms' MORE (D-Ill.) at the Decatur House this past weekend — fittingly, just a block from the White House.

Whitaker, an Oscar winner for his portrayal of former Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in “The Last King of Scotland,” was celebrating his appearance on the cover of Capitol File magazine. Keisha, looking like a model in a short, form-fitting white dress and fancy updo hairstyle, noted that they would not be in town for long — they were headed to Birmingham, Ala., this week to campaign for Obama.

In a 90-second exclusive interview — that’s all his handlers would allow — Forest said he had visited eight countries last year and realized that the U.S. is sorely in need of a leader who can restore its global reputation.

“It’s a sad state of affairs,” said Whitaker, dressed handsomely in a dark suit and burgundy tie. “That’s why I’m stepping up this time.”  

Whitaker, who is now starring in “The Great Debaters,” has never visited Capitol Hill.

But don’t count him out. Whitaker, a vegetarian, has been known to advocate for vegetarianism, and has even recorded a public service announcement with People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals.



Rep. Reichert turns up as ‘Jeopardy!’ question

The next best thing to being a contestant on “Jeopardy!” may be being a question in the “Smorgasbord” category.

This is what happened to Rep. Dave ReichertDavid (Dave) George ReichertGOP lawmakers back discharge petition to force immigration votes Major GOP super PAC expands field offices to 31 districts With bills on the table, Congress must heed the call to fix our national parks MORE (R-Wash.) last Wednesday evening as game show host Alex Trebek declared, “For $600: In 2006, Rep. Dave Reichert marked the anniversary of this 1989 wreck by asking that $4.5 billion finally be paid to Alaskans.”

The question, delivered by Brandon Jones, a 31-year-old culinary student from Chicago: “What is Exxon Valdez?”

In 2006, Reichert fought for the victims of the Exxon Valdez oil spill, demanding that the company pay damages to those who suffered from the incident.

“It was exciting to have his efforts go on national television,” said spokeswoman Abigail Shilling, explaining that her boss is still fighting for this cause. Although the congressman himself did not catch his mention, his mother, Marlys Klontz, who lives in Auburn, Wash., did. She’s an avid “Jeopardy!” watcher.