No-excuse lawmakers: The members who never miss a vote

ITK loves to rib members (see Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. item below), but we also give them props — when warranted. 

So today, ITK is saluting the legislators who have had perfect voting attendance in 2011 and 2012. Of course, this list doesn’t mean these members are the best in Congress, but heck, at least they show up day after day. 

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Members of the Senate 

Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinCongress should take the lead on reworking a successful Iran deal 'Fix' the Iran deal, but don't move the goalposts North Korea tensions ease ahead of Winter Olympics MORE (D-Md.)

Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsDemocrats search for 51st net neutrality vote Overnight Tech: States sue FCC over net neutrality repeal | Senate Dems reach 50 votes on measure to override repeal | Dems press Apple on phone slowdowns, kids' health | New Android malware found Overnight Regulation: Dems claim 50 votes in Senate to block net neutrality repeal | Consumer bureau takes first step to revising payday lending rule | Trump wants to loosen rules on bank loans | Pentagon, FDA to speed up military drug approvals MORE (R-Maine)

Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenPawlenty opts out of Senate run in Minnesota EMILY’s List president: Franken did 'right thing for Minnesota' Dem pledges to ask all court nominees about sexual harassment history under oath MORE (D-Minn.)

Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyGOP senators eager for Romney to join them Five hurdles to a big DACA and border deal Grand jury indicts Maryland executive in Uranium One deal: report MORE (R-Iowa)

Mike JohannsMichael (Mike) Owen JohannsFarmers, tax incentives can ease the pain of a smaller farm bill Lobbying World To buy a Swiss company, ChemChina must pass through Washington MORE (R-Neb.)

Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonGOP senators eager for Romney to join them The House needs to help patients from being victimized by antiquated technology Comey’s original Clinton memo released, cites possible violations MORE (R-Wis.)

Carl LevinCarl LevinCongress: The sleeping watchdog Congress must not give companies tax reasons to move jobs overseas A lesson on abuse of power by Obama and his Senate allies MORE (D-Mich.)

Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSessions: 'We should be like Canada' in how we take in immigrants NSA spying program overcomes key Senate hurdle Overnight Finance: Lawmakers see shutdown odds rising | Trump calls for looser rules for bank loans | Consumer bureau moves to revise payday lending rule | Trump warns China on trade deficit MORE (R-Ky.)

Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidDems search for winning playbook Dems face hard choice for State of the Union response The Memo: Immigration battle tests activists’ muscle MORE (D-Nev.)

Members of the House 

• Sandy Adams (R-Fla.)

• Jason Altmire (D-Pa.)

Justin AmashJustin AmashOvernight Defense: House votes to renew surveillance program | More drones, troops headed to Afghanistan | Former officers urge lawmakers to curb Trump's nuclear powers Overnight Tech: House votes to reauthorize surveillance powers | Twitter on defensive after Project Veritas video | Senate panel to hold hearing on bitcoin Overnight Cybersecurity: House votes to renew NSA spying | Trump tweets spark confusion | Signs Russian hackers are targeting Olympics | Bannon expected to appear before House Intel panel MORE (R-Mich.)

• Steve Chabot (R-Ohio)

• Mike Conaway (R-Texas)

Chuck FleischmannCharles (Chuck) Joseph FleischmannGOP could punt funding fight to January Lawmakers call on Treasury to take tougher stance on Hamas in Qatar The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on tax-reform bill MORE (R-Tenn.)

• John Kline (R-Minn.)

• Sandy Levin (D-Mich.)

• Frank LoBiondo (R-N.J.)

• Fred Upton (R-Mich.)

Steve WomackStephen (Steve) Allen WomackWomack wins initial support to become Budget chairman Overnight Finance: Trump promises farmers 'better deal' on NAFTA | Clock ticks to shutdown deadline | Dems worry Trump pressuring IRS on withholdings | SEC halts trading in digital currency firm This week: Clock ticks toward shutdown deadline MORE (R-Ark.)

Honorable mentions: Rep. Kathy Hochul (D-N.Y.), who has made every floor vote since winning her special election in May of 2011; Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanFlake's anti-Trump speech will make a lot of noise, but not much sense Top GOP candidate drops out of Ohio Senate race Overnight Tech: Regulators to look at trading in bitcoin futures | Computer chip flaws present new security problem | Zuckerberg vows to improve Facebook in 2018 MORE (R-Ohio) made every vote in 2011, though his perfect record was blemished last week. 

 Cardin told ITK there have been some close calls where leaders have accommodated his requests to keep a vote open. 

Asked whether he will be perfect the rest of the year, Cardin responded, “You never know,” adding that needs in his state and/or family have to be considered. 

Altmire’s office said the Pennsylvania Democrat has not missed a vote since being sworn in to office in 2007, a total of 4,551 votes. 

Altmire and Amash have a bit of a rivalry on the issue, according to Amash spokesman Will Adams. 

“Jason Altmire recently let the clock run down without voting to see how Justin would react. Justin actually got nervous for him and started to search around for him in a panic. Rep. Altmire showed up to vote right before the board closed with a grin on his face. There’s a friendly rivalry, but obviously Rep. Altmire has the longer streak right now,” Adams said. 

Upton takes his voting attendance very seriously. He has had various streaks during his 13 terms on Capitol Hill and winces at the memories of the few he has missed. His initial streak was broken as he was stuck on a runway due to dense fog. 

LoBiondo, meanwhile, has only missed 26 votes since 1995, according to the lawmaker’s spokesman. 

But none of them compares to Grassley, who last missed a roll call vote in July 1993, when he accompanied then-President Clinton to Iowa to inspect flood damage. Before that, he missed a vote in 1989 because of a death in his family.

In a statement, Grassley told ITK, “People are cynical about government and wonder if you’re really on the job. When the Senate’s in session, I’m in Washington voting, and when the Senate is out of session, I’m in Iowa holding meetings with constituents.”