Poll: Washingtonians most likely to swear at the office

The nation’s capital is the city where workers are likely to curse the most on the job, but several senators swear the expletives aren’t flying in their offices.

The nationwide poll from job-listing website CareerBuilder.com finds 62 percent of employees in the nation’s capital — more than any other major city — admit to using profanity while at work.

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When it comes to blue language, Sen. Mike Lee says you won’t hear any if you drop by his Hart Senate Office Building workspace. 

“It’s not part of our culture in my office. We tend not to do that. It’s not the kind of environment I want in my office, so people tend not to do it,” said the Utah Republican. But Lee concedes the survey’s findings probably aren’t far off, adding, “A lot of that does happen in Washington.”

The news of the District’s propensity for dropping F-bombs at the office wasn’t particularly mind-blowing to Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), either. The lawmaker said with a smile, “If you lived here and you didn’t curse, I’d be surprised.”

Sen. Jack Reed (D-R.I.), a West Point grad, says compared to his old gig, any colorful words he hears at the Capitol are no big deal. “Obviously, [those surveyed] have never been on a military post as commander of paratroopers.”

Rounding out the top three cities most likely to swear at the office were Denver and Chicago. The Windy City’s ranking was likely boosted by Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who has long been fond of four-letter words.

Having a city in his home state come in at No. 2 in the survey had Sen. Mark Udall (D-Colo.) exclaiming, “I want to see this study!”

He then questioned the results, saying, “There’s no way. Coloradans, we’re much more about action than talk. We walk the walk, not talk the talk. We’re easygoing, we’re informal. When’s the last time you saw our governor wear a tie?”

Whatever the case, CareerBuilder suggests workers might want to keep their bad words to a minimum. According to the survey, 64 percent of employers said they would think less of an employee who curses frequently. Another 57 percent said they would think twice about promoting a staffer who uses obscenities at the office.

Sen. Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) wasn’t so flabbergasted by the findings, remarking of D.C.’s top ranking, “Well, there’s a lot to swear about, I’ll say that.”