TRENDING:

SPONSORED:

Poll: Washingtonians most likely to swear at the office

The nation’s capital is the city where workers are likely to curse the most on the job, but several senators swear the expletives aren’t flying in their offices.

The nationwide poll from job-listing website CareerBuilder.com finds 62 percent of employees in the nation’s capital — more than any other major city — admit to using profanity while at work.

ADVERTISEMENT
When it comes to blue language, Sen. Mike LeeMike LeeOvernight Healthcare: Medical cures bill finally heads to White House Overnight Energy: Trump taps EPA foe to head agency | Energy reform bill officially dead Senate GOP: National museum should include Clarence Thomas MORE says you won’t hear any if you drop by his Hart Senate Office Building workspace. 

“It’s not part of our culture in my office. We tend not to do that. It’s not the kind of environment I want in my office, so people tend not to do it,” said the Utah Republican. But Lee concedes the survey’s findings probably aren’t far off, adding, “A lot of that does happen in Washington.”

The news of the District’s propensity for dropping F-bombs at the office wasn’t particularly mind-blowing to Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamOvernight Cybersecurity: Retired general picked to head DHS | Graham vows to probe Russian election interference Overnight Tech: AT&T, Time Warner CEOs defend merger before Congress | More tech execs join Trump team | Republican details path to undoing net neutrality Overnight Finance: Trump blasts Carrier's union leader | What's in the spending bill | Jamie Dimon gets perch for Trump era | AT&T, Time Warner execs grilled MORE (R-S.C.), either. The lawmaker said with a smile, “If you lived here and you didn’t curse, I’d be surprised.”

Sen. Jack ReedJack ReedBudowsky: Did Putin elect Trump? This Week in Cybersecurity: Dems press for information on Russian hacks A Cabinet position for Petraeus; disciplinary actions for Broadwell after affair MORE (D-R.I.), a West Point grad, says compared to his old gig, any colorful words he hears at the Capitol are no big deal. “Obviously, [those surveyed] have never been on a military post as commander of paratroopers.”

Rounding out the top three cities most likely to swear at the office were Denver and Chicago. The Windy City’s ranking was likely boosted by Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who has long been fond of four-letter words.

Having a city in his home state come in at No. 2 in the survey had Sen. Mark UdallMark UdallGardner's chief of staff tapped for Senate GOP campaign director The untold stories of the 2016 battle for the Senate Colorado GOP Senate race to unseat Dem incumbent is wide open MORE (D-Colo.) exclaiming, “I want to see this study!”

He then questioned the results, saying, “There’s no way. Coloradans, we’re much more about action than talk. We walk the walk, not talk the talk. We’re easygoing, we’re informal. When’s the last time you saw our governor wear a tie?”

Whatever the case, CareerBuilder suggests workers might want to keep their bad words to a minimum. According to the survey, 64 percent of employers said they would think less of an employee who curses frequently. Another 57 percent said they would think twice about promoting a staffer who uses obscenities at the office.

Sen. Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) wasn’t so flabbergasted by the findings, remarking of D.C.’s top ranking, “Well, there’s a lot to swear about, I’ll say that.”