Klayman attacks ‘Whores’ in new book

The book, Whores: Why and How I Came to Fight the Establishment, recounts Klayman’s 15 years of battling politicians, governments and corporations he views as corrupt.

Klayman’s preferred method of warfare is the lawsuit, and his most notable targets have included former President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonCourt questions greens’ challenge to EPA chemical rule delay The only way out of this mess Federal court tosses out Obama-era rule requiring financial advisers to act in customers' best interests MORE, former Vice President Dick Cheney and the government of Iran, which Klayman recently sued for $10 trillion on account of its human-rights abuses.

“Tehran is the most important thing that’s going on right now,” Klayman told ITK. “Those young people can change everything. And we’re not helping them.”

At times, the book reads like a legal thriller in which Klayman is the hero; at others, like a classic political memoir, but with plenty of conspiracy theory and conservative politics throughout.

Klayman, who launched an unsuccessful bid for the Senate in 2004, filed numerous suits against the Clintons in the 1990s over financial dealings. But even though Klayman ran as a Republican, he’s not happy with the GOP, either.

Asked about the Republican front-runners in the 2012 presidential election, Klayman scoffed: “No one interests me. [Former Alaska Gov. Sarah] Palin’s not the answer. We don’t know who she is.” He then expressed some less-than-diplomatic opinions about other GOP aspirants.

Klayman had some advice for Palin, however. “When I first met Jeb Bush in 1994, he was a blank slate, just faking his way through the conversation. But he educated himself and became an intellectual of sorts. Palin can do what Jeb Bush did.”

Klayman is a fan of Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyOvernight Tech: Facebook faces crisis over Cambridge Analytica data | Lawmakers demand answers | What to watch for next | Day one of AT&T's merger trial | Self-driving Uber car kills pedestrian Overnight Cybersecurity: Trump-linked data firm Cambridge Analytica attracts scrutiny | House passes cyber response team bill | What to know about Russian cyberattacks on energy grid Overnight Finance: Congress races to finish .2T funding bill | What to look for in omnibus | AT&T merger trial kicks off | Stocks fall on tech troubles | Trump targets Venezuelan cryptocurrency | Record SEC whistleblower payout MORE (R-Iowa), the ranking member of the Senate Finance Committee, and Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump informally offered Cohn CIA job before changing his mind: report Schiff: I thought more Republicans would speak out against Trump Trump presses GOP to change Senate rules MORE (R- Ariz.).

When he’s not battling the powers that be, Klayman takes to the stage. “I do stand-up sometimes at night at the Buddha bar in Boca Raton,” he said. “It’s good practice, and you can make a lot of points using humor.

“I’m an optimist. I’m trying to make things better, and I wouldn’t do this if I didn’t believe it could be done.”