Bill Clinton compares Trump's fake news rhetoric to ‘dictators club’ tactics

Former President Clinton on Wednesday expressed concern that President Trump's rhetoric reflects the same values as dictators around the world.

Clinton said on the late night show "Conan" that the world’s dictators all want to blur the line between fact and fiction.

"They figure if you don’t know what’s true and you don’t think you can ever know that, pretty soon everybody will accept the fact that democracy is no longer possible," Clinton told host Conan O'Brien.

“Are you talking about foreign countries now or here?” O’Brien asked. “That chilled me to the bone for a second.”

Clinton hesitated. 

“You just said a lot by saying nothing,” O'Brien said.

“We need to tell all these people that just make up stuff on the internet to knock it off,” Clinton said. “We’re voting for people that are going to do jobs. These are jobs and as soon as somebody gets one of these jobs you find out pretty quick that the decisions they make have consequences.”

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Clinton sat for an interview with Conan O’Brien on the anniversary of President Trump's win over Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGrassley blasts Democrats over unwillingness to probe Clinton GOP lawmakers cite new allegations of political bias in FBI Top intel Dem: Trump Jr. refused to answer questions about Trump Tower discussions with father MORE. The late-night host asked Clinton if the country has changed since he was campaigning for president in 1992.

“The country is much more diverse than it used to be and I think that’s a good thing,” Clinton said.

“The thing that’s not so good is we’re in the middle of,” Clinton began, before an audience member shouted “Trump!” 

“Well, there is that,” Clinton said. “Believe me, I know, especially today.”

Clinton spoke nearly uninterrupted for the next five minutes about policies that restrict immigration and the spread of misinformation that he believes aided President Trump during last year’s elections.

Clinton criticized efforts to disenfranchise voters, such as immigrants, the elderly and the poor, saying a key reason there’s no immigration reform is that representatives who oppose it worry expanding the electorate would hurt their political prospects.

Those who are unhappy with recent policies bear some responsibility if they don’t vote in mid-term elections, Clinton added.

“We need to just go out and start going up to people who are mad at us and say let’s get over it,” Clinton said. “We’ve got to live together, we’ve got to share this together, and if we work together we’ll have better economics, we’ll have better societies and we’ll have a culture that we can all be a part of.”