Obama set to brief congressional leaders on Libya situation

President Obama will brief members of Congress on Friday afternoon on the situation in Libya just before he addresses the nation.

The White House announced Friday that Obama has invited a bipartisan group of lawmakers to the Situation Room to consult on Libya. Obama is scheduled to deliver a statement to the public at 2 p.m.

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The meeting follows the United Nations decision Thursday to impose a no-fly zone and other military measures aimed at stopping Col. Moammar Gadhafi from violently quashing a rebellion against his leadership.

Among those expected to participate are: House Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerTrump aide: Boehner is the disaster Boehner: Tax reform is 'just a bunch of happy talk' Lobbying World MORE (R-Ohio), Majority Leader Eric CantorEric CantorTrump nominates two new DOD officials Brat: New ObamaCare repeal bill has 'significant' changes Overnight Energy: Flint lawmaker pushes EPA for new lead rule MORE (R-Va.), Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.), Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidGOP frustrated by slow pace of Trump staffing This week: Congress awaits Comey testimony Will Republicans grow a spine and restore democracy? MORE (D-Nev.), Minority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellOvernight Energy: Trump energy nominees face Congress | OPEC to extend production cuts Senate confirms Trump's first lower-court nominee Top GOP senators tell Trump to ditch Paris climate deal MORE (R-Ky.) and Sens. Dick Lugar (R-Ind.), Saxby ChamblissSaxby ChamblissGOP hopefuls crowd Georgia special race Democrats go for broke in race for Tom Price's seat Spicer: Trump will 'help the team' if needed in Georgia special election MORE (R-Ga.), Dick DurbinDick DurbinThe Hill's 12:30 Report Top House, Senate Dems ask Interior not to eliminate national monuments Dem senators accuse Trump of purposefully holding back information MORE (D-Ill.), Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.), John KerryJohn KerryJohn Kerry channels Yoda in tweetstorm John Kerry goes on tweetstorm as Senate eyes Iran legislation John Kerry's advice to Harvard grads: Learn Russian MORE (D-Mass.) and Dianne FeinsteinDianne FeinsteinThe case for protecting America's intelligence agency whistleblowers Senate confirms Trump's first lower-court nominee Feinstein: Comey memos 'going to be turned over' MORE (D-Calif.).
 
Also scheduled to attend are Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.), Howard Berman (D-Calif.), Mike Rogers (R-Mich.) and Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Md.).

Some lawmakers have already left Washington and will participate in the briefing by phone.

A White House official said Sen. John McCainJohn McCainArmed Services chairman unveils .1B Asia-Pacific security bill Overnight Defense: Trump scolds NATO allies over spending | Flurry of leaks worries allies | Senators rip B Army 'debacle' | Lawmakers demand hearing on Saudi arms deal The case for protecting America's intelligence agency whistleblowers MORE (R-Ariz.) had been invited but could not participate. The official did not know if Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamSenate panel could pass new Russia sanctions this summer Overnight Cybersecurity: Bad Russian intel may have swayed Comey's handling of Clinton probe | Apple sees spike in data requests | More subpoenas for Flynn | DOJ's plan for data warrants Overnight Finance: GOP bill would leave 23M more uninsured, says CBO | Trump aides defend budget | Mnuchin asks for clean debt hike before August | Ryan says House could pass bill without border tax MORE (R-S.C.) had been invited.

Gadhafi’s forces have retaken towns that fell to rebels over the past week, and the Libyan dictator on Thursday warned of an assault on the city of Benghazi, the last stronghold of his opponents.

On Friday, in response to the UN resolution, Gadhafi reportedly ordered a ceasefire in Libya, one of the conditions of the resolution.

But Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonClinton: ‘I don’t die’ despite the right’s ‘best efforts’ Clinton: Comey firing is ‘an effort to derail and bury’ Russia probe RNC slams Clinton speech as example of 'why she lost' MORE said Friday the U.S. wanted more than just promises by the Libyan government that it would hold a ceasefire.

“We are going to be not responsive or impressed by words, we would have to see actions on the ground and that is not yet at all clear,” Clinton said. “We will continue to work with our partners in the international community to press Gadhafi to leave and to support the legitimate aspirations of the Libyan people.”

On Thursday, Gadhafi threatened to "cleanse" Benghazi.

Clinton said the U.N.’s passage of the resolution is just one step the international community is taking to remove Gadhafi from power and stop violence in the Libya.

“While this resolution is an important step, it is only that, an important step,” Clinton said.

She added that the top priority for the international community was to impose an immediate ceasefire and stop Gadhafi's military forces from killing Libyan civilians.

“Again, I want to take this one step at a time. We don't know what the final outcome will be,” Clinton said. “The first and overwhelmingly urgent outcome is to end the violence.”

The next step, Clinton said, was to “operationalize” the no-fly zone resolution.

The measure approved by the U.N. allows “all necessary measures” to protect Libyan civilians. This could include setting up a no-fly zone over Libya’s skies, but could also include air strikes on Libyan forces threatening Benghazi.

NATO may be getting involved.

Adm. James Stavridis, U.S. European Command chief and NATO's supreme allied commander, tweeted Friday: "On #Libya -- we are in detailed planning for a wide variety of contingencies from #NATO."

Stavridis is considered a contender to replace current Joint Chiefs Chairman Adm. Michael Mullen when his term expires this Fall.

Separately, in Yemen, 30 protesters against that country's government were reportedly killed by security forces and government loyalists, which drew condemnation from Obama. He called on Yemen's president to allow peaceful demonstrations.

"It is more important than ever for all sides to participate in an open and transparent process that addresses the legitimate concerns of the Yemeni people, and provides a peaceful, orderly and democratic path to a stronger and more prosperous nation," the president said in a statement.

John T. Bennett contributed.

This post was last updated at 1:39 p.m.