President Obama: I’m going to win reelection

President Obama said in no uncertain terms on Thursday that he will win his reelection campaign in November.

Asked by ABC News’s Diane Sawyer if he was going to win, Obama replied: “Yes.”

He also told Sawyer he would "fight with every fiber of my being" for a second term.

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"How much do you want it?" Sawyer asked Obama in the interview.

"Badly," Obama said. "Because I think the country needs it."

Just a few months ago, Obama described himself as an underdog in the 2012 election.

In another interview with ABC in November, Obama was asked if the odds were stacked against him in the presidential election. “Absolutely,” he replied.

“I’m used to being the underdog,” Obama said.

Since then, Obama has seen his approval ratings improve a tick along with the economy. He won a major victory when the GOP House initially opposed an extension of a payroll tax cut, and he also may be benefitting from the GOP primary fight.

For the second day in a row on Wednesday, Obama named his Republican opponents who are in the midst of a battle in Florida.

Obama didn't single out whom he thinks he might face in November but he grouped three of the GOP presidential candidates in one category saying the country has seen their policies before.

"We've gotten a taste of Mr. Romney or Mr. Gingrich or Mr. Santorum's theories," Obama said. "We've tried it for 10 years. And it resulted in a huge crash that lost us the most jobs since the 1930's."

He also said that his proposal to tax millionaires is a "recipe for a fair, sound approach to deficit reduction and rebuilding this country."

"I think whether it's Romney or Gingrich or Santorum or any of these folks, the question to ask them is we now have the lowest tax rates in 50 years. We've seen the highest increase in income for the very top echelons since the 1920s. And if, in fact, we're going to reduce our deficit while still investing in those things that we know make America grow, somebody's got to pay for it," Obama said.


"I think better I pay for it or Mr. Romney pay for it or Mr. Gingrich help pay for it than a senior citizen suddenly seeing several thousands of dollars in additional Medicare increases or a student who's trying to struggle their way through school," he continued.

While the president touted some steps he took to improve the economy, he also confessed that he second guesses his decisions "constantly."

"I make a mistake, you know, every hour, every day," he said, with a chuckle. "There are always things that you're learning in the job. I have no doubt that I'm a better president now than the day I took office just because you get more experience."

He also refuted Newt Gingrich's sentiment that he is "the food stamp president."

"First of all, I don't put people on food stamps," he said. "People become eligible for food stamps. Second of all, the initial expansion of food-stamp eligibility happened under my Republican predecessor, not under me. Number 3, When you have a disastrous economic crash that results in 8 million people losing their jobs, more people are going to need more support from government."

Obama wouldn't say if the label "food stamp president" was laced with racism. But he did say Americans will have to decide in November "about who's trying to bring the country together and who's dividing it, who reflects the core values that helped create this country ... and who is tapping into some of our worst instincts."

Obama didn't single out whom he thinks he might face in November, but  grouped three of the GOP presidential candidates in one category, saying the country has seen their policies before.

"We've got a test of Mr. Romney or Mr. Gingrich or Mr. Santorum's theories," Obama said. "We tried it for 10 years. And it resulted in a huge crash that lost us the most jobs since the 1930s."

He also said that his tax proposal to tax millionaires, is a "recipe for a fair, sound approach to deficit reduction and rebuilding this country.

"I think whether it's Romney or Gingrich or Santorum or any of these folks, the question to ask them is, we now have the lowest tax rates in 50 years. We've seen the highest increase in income for the very top echelons since the 1920s. And if, in fact, we're going to reduce our deficit while still investing in those things that we know make America grow, somebody's got to pay for it," Obama said.

"I think better I pay for it, or Mr. Romney pay for it, or Mr. Gingrich help pay for it, than a senior citizen suddenly seeing several thousands of dollars in additional Medicare increases or a student who's trying to struggle their way through school," he continued.

While the president touted some steps he took to improve the economy, he also confessed that he second guesses his decisions "constantly."

"I make a mistake, you know, every hour, every day," he said, with a chuckle. "There are always things that you're learning in the job. I have no doubt that I'm a better president now than the day I took office just because you get more experience."


Updated at 7:57 p.m.