Obama attends funeral of longtime friend, ambassadorial nominee

Obama attends funeral of longtime friend, ambassadorial nominee
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President Obama on Tuesday evening attended the funeral of longtime friend and former adviser Cassandra Quin Butts, who died suddenly last week from leukemia. 

Obama praised Butts as "a warrior for social justice, a warm and generous servant who devoted her life to bettering the lives of others." 
He told mourners at Washington, D.C.’s Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church how Butts came to earn his trust and friendship starting during their time in law school and then in politics. 
The president choked up as he spoke about her "fundamental kindness." 
"She was a kind person," he said, according to a reporter at the service. "It turns out, as you get older, kindness counts for a lot."
The ceremony drew other well-known figures from the worlds of politics and media, including Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderHolder: 2018 vote crucial to combating gerrymandering Holder: Sessions needs to 'have the guts' to say no to Trump Holder urges Justice Dept, FBI officials to 'be strong' in face of attacks: 'It will get worse' MORE, Rep. James Clyburn (D-S.C.) and PBS anchor Gwen Ifill.

Butts, 50, was a classmate of Obama’s at Harvard Law School. She worked on the president’s transition team and as a deputy White House counsel before he nominated her in February 2014 to serve as ambassador to the Bahamas. 

But she died before the Senate held a vote on her confirmation, with a total of 835 days elapsing between the day she was nominated and the day she died. 

The delay drew renewed interest after Butts’s death. 

“All Cassandra wanted to do was serve her country,” Valerie Jarrett, an aide to Obama, told New York Times columnist Frank Bruni.

Butt’s nomination was blocked by Republican senators, including Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Tech: Facebook faces crisis over Cambridge Analytica data | Lawmakers demand answers | What to watch for next | Day one of AT&T's merger trial | Self-driving Uber car kills pedestrian The case for a new branch of the military: United States Space Force The problem with hindsight MORE (Texas) and Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonRussian spy poisoning brings world powers closer to day of reckoning GOP senators see Tillerson ouster as the new normal Cotton: Russia will 'lie and deny' about British spy poisoning MORE (Ark.), over unrelated issues. 

Cotton put a hold on Butts and two other ambassadorial nominees over a Secret Service leak of private information about a member of Congress.

Knowing of Butts’s relationship with Obama, he eventually lifted holds on the other two nominees, but not her, in order to anger the president, she told Bruni.