Jesse Jackson to Obama: Pardon Clinton

The Rev. Jesse Jackson says President Obama should preemptively pardon Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillicon Valley: FBI fires Strzok after anti-Trump tweets | Trump signs defense bill with cyber war policy | Google under scrutiny over location data | Sinclair's troubles may just be beginning | Tech to ease health data access | Netflix CFO to step down Signs grow that Mueller is zeroing in on Roger Stone Omarosa claims president called Trump Jr. a 'f--- up' for releasing Trump Tower emails MORE for any crimes she may have committed.

“Secretary Clinton has not been legally accused, indicted, tried or convicted of anything,” he said of the former secretary of State in Ann Arbor, Mich., on Wednesday. "It would be a monumental, moral and political mistake to pursue the prosecution of Hillary Clinton."

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“President Obama should follow President Ford’s example and offer a preemptive full pardon,” Jackson added, referencing President Gerald Ford’s pardon of President Richard Nixon in 1974.

President-elect Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpAl Gore: Trump has had 'less of an impact on environment so far than I feared' Trump claims tapes of him saying the 'n-word' don't exist Trump wanted to require staffers to get permission before writing books: report MORE repeatedly vowed during his campaign that he would appoint a special prosecutor to investigate Clinton, his Democratic opponent in the presidential election.

Trump repeatedly blasted the FBI as “rigged” for recommending not to pursue charges against Clinton for using a private email server while secretary of State.

The Republican even famously suggested during his final presidential debate with Clinton she’d “be in jail” if he oversaw the criminal justice system.

Trump’s remarks invigorated his supporters, many of whom chanted “lock her up” during the billionaire’s rallies.

Trump has since toned down his rhetoric toward Clinton after his win last week.

“It’s not something I’ve given a lot of thought, because I want to solve healthcare, jobs, border control, tax reform,” he told The Wall Street Journal on Nov. 11 when asked about prosecuting Clinton.