Albright: I’m ‘very concerned’ by Trump’s tweets

Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright says she is concerned about how President-elect Donald TrumpDonald TrumpOPINION: Trump's budget will supercharge America's economy The Hill's 12:30 Report Justice ethics experts clear Mueller to head Russia probe MORE’s tweeting may affect foreign policy.

“I’m going to try to be polite,” she said Tuesday at the U.S. Institute of Peace conference in Washington, D.C., according to Politico.

“Let me just say that I am very concerned about the tweets and generally about the messages that are going out,” added Albright, who endorsed 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonOklahoma rep. launches long-shot bid for Oversight chair Europeans are terrified by America's family feud Poll: Comey was deeply unpopular at time of firing MORE over Trump.

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Albright said she fears Twitter is too different from established diplomatic protocols between global leaders.

“I do think there has been a system in the world for a very long time for how governments communicate with one another, how presidents communicate with each other, [and] how those documents are developed,” she said.

“Are they a part of some of kind of a decision making process that does in fact reflect what the government thinks and the Congress thinks and what the American people thinks? And the tweets don’t deal with that.”

Albright additionally cautioned against Trump’s “America First” philosophy, noting the U.S. “needs to be engaged” with allies overseas.

“That is a message, I think, that we need to get out there, not as ‘America First,’ but as ‘America as a partner.' There is nothing wrong with partnerships.”

Outgoing Secretary of State John KerryJohn KerryColombia's president is a foreign guest Trump should listen to Anti-ISIS cyber op struggled with issue of notifying allies How American compassion, vision and innovation can end the AIDS epidemic MORE also criticized Trump’s tweeting during Tuesday’s conference.

“Every country in the world better ... start worrying about authoritarian populism and the absence of substance in our dialogue,” said Kerry, who also backed Clinton over Trump.

“If policies are going to be made in 140 characters on Twitter, and every reasonable measurement of accountability is being bypassed, and people don’t care about it, we have a problem.”

Trump has frequently used Twitter as a means of hammering opponents ranging from celebrities to foreign governors.

Critics say the social media platform’s 140-character limit, however, may oversimplify complicated policy issues.