Albright: I’m ‘very concerned’ by Trump’s tweets

Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright says she is concerned about how President-elect Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpKoch-backed group launches six-figure ad buy against Heitkamp Anti-abortion Dem wins primary fight Lipinski holds slim lead in tough Illinois primary fight MORE’s tweeting may affect foreign policy.

“I’m going to try to be polite,” she said Tuesday at the U.S. Institute of Peace conference in Washington, D.C., according to Politico.

“Let me just say that I am very concerned about the tweets and generally about the messages that are going out,” added Albright, who endorsed 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonKoch-backed group launches six-figure ad buy against Heitkamp Trump keeps up 'low IQ' attack on Maxine Waters GOP leaders to Trump: Leave Mueller alone MORE over Trump.

Albright said she fears Twitter is too different from established diplomatic protocols between global leaders.

“I do think there has been a system in the world for a very long time for how governments communicate with one another, how presidents communicate with each other, [and] how those documents are developed,” she said.

“Are they a part of some of kind of a decision making process that does in fact reflect what the government thinks and the Congress thinks and what the American people thinks? And the tweets don’t deal with that.”

Albright additionally cautioned against Trump’s “America First” philosophy, noting the U.S. “needs to be engaged” with allies overseas.

“That is a message, I think, that we need to get out there, not as ‘America First,’ but as ‘America as a partner.' There is nothing wrong with partnerships.”

Outgoing Secretary of State John KerryJohn Forbes KerryKentucky candidate takes heat for tweeting he'd like to use congressman for target practice Breitbart editor: Biden's son inked deal with Chinese government days after vice president’s trip State lawmakers pushing for carbon taxes aimed at the poor MORE also criticized Trump’s tweeting during Tuesday’s conference.

“Every country in the world better ... start worrying about authoritarian populism and the absence of substance in our dialogue,” said Kerry, who also backed Clinton over Trump.

“If policies are going to be made in 140 characters on Twitter, and every reasonable measurement of accountability is being bypassed, and people don’t care about it, we have a problem.”

Trump has frequently used Twitter as a means of hammering opponents ranging from celebrities to foreign governors.

Critics say the social media platform’s 140-character limit, however, may oversimplify complicated policy issues.