Trump taps Pence to head voter fraud investigation

President Trump will have Vice President Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceTrump, Pence offer condolences to families of Missouri boat tour victims GOP to hold 2020 convention in Charlotte Election Countdown: Senate, House Dems build cash advantage | 2020 Dems slam Trump over Putin presser | Trump has M in war chest | Republican blasts parents for donating to rival | Ocasio-Cortez, Sanders to campaign in Kansas MORE oversee a special commission to investigate voter fraud, which he says helped Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonWhite House protests extend into sixth day despite rain Clinton: US is 'losing friends and allies' under Trump Justice Dept releases surveillance applications for former Trump aide MORE win the popular vote.

“I’m going to set up a commission to be headed by Vice President Mike Pence and we’re going to look at it very, very carefully,” Trump told Fox News’s Bill O’Reilly in an interview airing Sunday afternoon before the Super Bowl.

“Look, Bill, we can be babies, but you take a look at the registration, you have illegals, you have dead people you have this, it’s really a bad situation, it’s really bad,” he said.

The announcement came up when Trump was asked about criticism that his claim of voter fraud is not backed up by the data.

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“Many people have come out and said I’m right, you know that,” Trump said. “You have illegals, you have dead people … it’s really a bad situation.”

The Washington Post reported that Pence pledged to GOP lawmakers at the annual Republican retreat in Philadelphia that the administration would initiate a “full evaluation” of voting rolls nationwide.

But Trump’s plans for a “major investigation” into what he claims were fraudulent votes by as many as 3 million to 5 million illegal immigrants may not get too far without congressional funding.

Already Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPelosi: 'Thug' Putin not welcome in Congress GOP to White House: End summit mystery Sunk judicial pick spills over into Supreme Court fight MORE (R-Ky.) has said he doesn’t want to spend federal funds on the investigation and leave it to state authorities.

But Trump on Sunday stuck to his claim of massive voter fraud, which even Republicans on Capitol Hill have questioned and The New York Times has dismissed as a “lie.”

Trump said there is evidence of votes being attributed to dead people and of people voting in different states in the same election.

McConnell and other GOP leaders agree there is voter fraud but not on the scale claimed by Trump.

“There is no evidence that it occurred in such a significant number that would have changed the presidential election,” he said on CNN’s “State of the Union” Sunday morning.