Spokeswoman: 'I don't think' Trump accepts Comey's denial of wiretap claims

A White House spokeswoman on Monday said she doesn't think President Trump accepts FBI Director James Comey's denial that former President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaPatagonia files suit against Trump cuts to Utah monuments Former Dem Tenn. gov to launch Senate bid: report Eighth Franken accuser comes forward as Dems call for resignation MORE wiretapped Trump Tower before the election, as Trump has insisted.

"No, I don't think he does," Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Monday on ABC's "Good Morning America."

She said Trump "wants the truth to come out to the American people and he is asking that it be done through the House Intelligence Committee and that that be the process that we go through." 

Trump claimed Saturday that Obama had his "wires tapped" in Trump Tower before his presidential victory.

ADVERTISEMENT
In a series of tweets Saturday morning, Trump presented no evidence and questioned whether it was legal for a sitting president to be wiretapping "a race for president prior to an election."

"How low has President Obama gone to tapp my phones during the very sacred election process," the president tweeted. "This is Nixon/Watergate. Bad (or sick) guy!" 

A New York Times report Sunday said Comey asked the Justice Department to publicly reject the president's claims.

Senior U.S. officials told the Times that Comey has said the president's wiretapping allegations are false and has asked the Justice Department on Saturday to publicly correct the record.

The FBI and Justice Department declined to comment to the newspaper.

Trump aide Kellyanne Conway also called for Comey to share any information he might have on Trump's allegations.

“If Mr. Comey has something he’d like to say I’m sure we’re all willing to hear it,” Conway said on Fox News. “All I saw was a published news report. I didn’t see a statement from him. I don’t know what Mr. Comey knows.

“If he knows, of course he can issue a statement,” Conway said. “We know he’s not shy.”

White House press secretary Sean Spicer on Sunday called the reports about "potentially politically motivated investigations" before the 2016 presidential election "very troubling."

In a series of tweets, he said the president is "requesting that as part of their investigation into Russian activity, the congressional intelligence committees exercise their oversight authority to determine whether executive branch investigation powers were abused in 2016."

Spicer said that neither the White House nor the president would "comment further until such oversight is conducted."