Roger Stone on allegations of Russian ties: 'They have no proof'

Roger Stone on allegations of Russian ties: 'They have no proof'

Roger Stone is insisting the allegations about his connections to Russia are unfounded.

“They have no proof of it and it was unnecessary,” Stone, who advised Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump warns Iran's Rouhani: Threaten us 'and you will suffer' Pompeo: Iran's leaders resemble the mafia NYT's Haberman: Trump 'often tells the truth' MORE's presidential campaign, said during Politico's "Off Message" podcast.

“As someone said, the Russians don't play American politics very well. That's true, although I never heard from them.”

Stone said last week his attorneys had notified the House Intelligence Committee chairman of his intent to appear before the panel as part of its investigation into Russian interference in the presidential election.
 
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Stone faces scrutiny for communicating with Guccifer 2.0, the alias of a hacker the U.S. intelligence community believes is associated with the Russian government. Stone has admitted to the contact but called it "completely innocuous."
 
In the interview with Politico published Monday, Stone was asked about comments he made last year regarding WikiLeaks' hint of a Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonCarter Page warrant reflects attack on our civil liberties Former Obama aide to Comey: 'No one is asking for your advice' Comey to Dems: 'Don't lose your minds and rush to the socialist left' MORE-related October surprise. "I actually have communicated with [WikiLeaks founder Julian] Assange," he said at the time.

“I was referring to what I—I mean, through the intermediary, which I see the headlines. No, I didn't admit that. I announced it. I didn't admit it. I announced it. It is not illegal and it was not direct, as I've said a dozen times,” Stone said.

“I didn't misspeak. This covers the question of communication through an intermediary.”

When asked about the attempts of White House aides to distance Stone from Trump, Stone said "perhaps they are cautious because they, of course, don't know how this ends."
 
He also called White House press secretary Sean Spicer's comments about Paul Manafort playing a limited role in Trump's campaign, despite being its chairman from March to August 2016, an "effort to put their distance, I guess, between them and Paul Manafort."
 
Stone was asked at the end of the interview if he would refuse to answer any of the committee's questions, citing his Fifth Amendment rights. 
 
"No," he said. "Why would I?"