Deputy AG Rosenstein says he's 'not quitting'

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein on Thursday denied that he threatened to resign after the White House sought to cast him as the primary actor in President Trump's decision to fire FBI Director James Comey.

Asked by Sinclair Broadcast Group reporter Michelle Macaluso about the reported threat, Rosenstein responded, "No, I'm not quitting."

The statement contradicts a Washington Post report on Wednesday that said that Rosenstein had threatened to leave the Justice Department.

The Post report said that Rosenstein, who wrote the memo to Trump recommending Comey's ouster, had threatened to quit because the White House had painted his recommendation as the driving force behind the FBI chief's termination.

ADVERTISEMENT

Other news outlets reported that Rosenstein was upset with the administration's portrayal of the matter. 

Trump abruptly fired Comey on Tuesday, writing in a letter to the FBI chief that he no longer felt Comey was capable of leading the bureau.

Trump said in the letter that his decision was based on the recommendation of Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsSessions: 'We should be like Canada' in how we take in immigrants DOJ wades into archdiocese fight for ads on DC buses Overnight Cybersecurity: Bipartisan bill aims to deter election interference | Russian hackers target Senate | House Intel panel subpoenas Bannon | DHS giving 'active defense' cyber tools to private sector MORE and Rosenstein, who wrote in a memo that Comey's handling of the FBI investigation into Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonIntel Dem decries White House 'gag order' after Bannon testimony 'Total free-for-all' as Bannon clashes with Intel members Mellman: On Political Authenticity (Part 2) MORE's use of a private email server was unprofessional and compromised his ability to oversee the agency.

Trump said on Thursday, however, that the decision to fire Comey was his alone and that he would have done so "regardless of the recommendation" from Rosenstein.

Competing accounts of the firing have also emerged, saying that Trump had decided to fire Comey and asked Rosenstein to build the case for ousting the FBI director.