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5 things to know about Trump's new chief of staff John Kelly

5 things to know about Trump's new chief of staff John Kelly
© Victoria Sarno Jordan

President Trump on Friday tapped his current head of Homeland Security as his new White House chief of staff. John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE, 67, is well known around Washington and in military circles. But as chief of staff, Kelly will soon become one of the most recognizable faces in the White House.

Here are five things you need to know about Trump’s new chief of staff.

Kelly is the second military officer to join the White House staff.

An experienced battlefield commander, Kelly joins Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, the national security adviser. His appointment means military officers now occupy two of the most senior White House positions, according to The Washington Post

Outgoing chief of staff Reince Priebus introduced him to Trump.

About 10 days after the election, Kelly got a call from Priebus, Kelly told NBC News host Pete Williams at the Aspen Security Forum, according to The Wall Street Journal. He initially thought it was a joke when Priebus told him the president-elect was considering him for a post in his administration.

He lost his son in Afghanistan in 2010 to a Taliban bomb.

At the time that made him the highest-ranking military officer to lose a son or daughter in Iraq or Afghanistan, according to The New York Times.

Kelly oversaw the military detention center at Guantanamo Bay.

His responsibility included the 2013 hunger strikes and the prisoner exchange for U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. In 2015, he also railed against a court order forbidding female guards from handling some prisoners, according to The Miami Herald.

Most Democrats showed support during his confirmation as head of DHS.

Democrats liked the way Kelly spoke bluntly about areas where his views differed from Trump’s, although he never broke completely from Trump policies. For example, while Kelly advocates increased border security he expressed doubt about the efficacy of a physical wall, according to The Washington Post.