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Trump condemns Charlottesville violence 'on many sides'

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTillerson: Russia already looking to interfere in 2018 midterms Dems pick up deep-red legislative seat in Missouri Speier on Trump's desire for military parade: 'We have a Napoleon in the making' MORE condemned the "egregious" racially charged clashes in Charlottesville, Va., on Saturday, but he avoided putting more blame on any particular group, saying hatred by "many sides" was to blame.

Trump made the remarks shortly after it was confirmed that one person had been killed and more than a dozen others injured after a car plowed into a crowd of people protesting against white nationalist and Nazi groups marching Saturday in Charlottesville.

"We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides — on many sides," Trump said at a press conference from his New Jersey golf course.

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"It's been going on for a long time in our country. Not Donald Trump, not Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaGOP lawmaker: Dems not standing for Trump is 'un-American' Forget the Nunes memo — where's the transparency with Trump’s personal finances? Mark Levin: Clinton colluded with Russia, 'paid for a warrant' to surveil Carter Page MORE. This has been going on for a long, long time," he continued. 

Trump also called attention to the economy during his remarks and praised state and local police at an event meant to highlight accomplishments by the Department of Veterans' Affairs during his administration. 

"Our country is doing very well in so many ways. We have record, just absolute record employment. We have unemployment the lowest it's been in almost seventeen years. We have companies pouring into our country. Foxconn and car companies and so many others, they're coming back to our country. We're renegotiating trade deals to make them great for our country and great for the American worker," he said. 

Trump came under criticism for not condemning the far right groups marching in Virginia, and for instead criticizing violence by "many sides."

"Mr. President - we must call evil by its name. These were white supremacists and this was domestic terrorism," Sen. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerRepublicans interested in Romney leading NRSC: report Overnight Finance: Mnuchin promises new Russia sanctions after uproar | Dow drops ahead of Trump State of the Union | GOP senators call on Trump to protect NAFTA | Regulators subpoena major bitcoin exchange Senate Republicans call on Trump to preserve NAFTA MORE (R-Colo.) wrote on Twitter.

"White supremacists, Neo-Nazis and anti-Semites are the antithesis of our American values," wrote Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, a Republican House member from Florida. "There are no other "sides" to hatred and bigotry."

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioTrump must send Russia powerful message through tougher actions McCain, Coons immigration bill sparks Trump backlash Taking a strong stance to protect election integrity MORE (R-Fla.) said in a message on Twitter it was "very important for the nation to hear @POTUS describe events in #Charlottesville for whgat they are, a terror attack by #whitesupremacists."

White nationalist, white supremacist and alt-right groups were initially scheduled to gather in Charlottesville's Emancipation Park Saturday to protest the city's decision to remove a Confederate statue there.

But as clashes broke out ahead of the so-called "Unite the Right" rally Saturday morning, police declared the gathering an unlawful assembly, breaking up the event before it officially began.

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) confirmed Saturday night that at least three people were killed during the violent clashes, including two police officers in a nearby helicopter crash.

The president first condemned the event on Twitter hours after the violence ensued.  

 
- This post was updated at 7:32 p.m.