Haley: Kim Jong Un 'begging for war'

U.S. United Nations Ambassador Nikki HaleyNimrata (Nikki) HaleyMattis hints at US military options for North Korea Trump, Netanyahu talk Middle East peace at UN meeting Trump begins first UN remarks by mentioning his nearby building MORE said Monday that North Korea's leader, Kim Jong Un, is "begging for war" with his "abusive use of missiles."

During an emergency meeting of the U.N. Security Council, Haley said "enough is enough," comments which come after North Korea said Sunday that it has successfully tested a miniaturized hydrogen bomb that can be placed an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM).

“The time for half measures in the security council is over. The time has come to exhaust all of our diplomatic means before it is too late. We must now adopt the strongest possible measures. Kim Jong Un’s action cannot be seen as defensive,” she said.

Haley, who has expressed frustration in recent weeks over North Korea’s increased aggression, said “an incremental approach” to handling the country’s nuclear ambitions has failed “despite the best of intentions.”

“We have kicked the can down the road long enough,” she said. “There is no more road left.”

Haley said the United States will circulate a resolution to be negotiated this week for a Monday vote.

North Korea has “slapped everyone in the face in the international community that has asked them to stop,” Haley said.

Later in the meeting, China’s Ambassador to the U.N., Liu Jieyi, pushed for “practical measures” to solve the North Korean nuclear issue, including dialogue. 

“The situation on the peninsula is deteriorating constantly as we speak, falling into a vicious circle. The peninsula issue must be resolved peacefully. China will never allow chaos and war on the peninsula,” he said.

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The ambassador pushed a joint proposal from his country and Russia in which North Korea would halt its nuclear missile activity, and the United States and South Korea would stop their military exercises. Haley earlier in the meeting called such a suggestion “insulting.”

Pyongyang’s claim that it tested a hydrogen bomb caused the Trump administration to sound the alarm on North Korea’s aggression, with Secretary of Defense James MattisJames Norman MattisOvernight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions Mattis hints at US military options for North Korea Mattis: US to send 3,000 more troops to Afghanistan MORE saying Pyongyang would face a "massive military response" should it threaten the United States or its allies. 

South Korea early Monday local time conducted live-fire exercises simulating a strike against North Korea in training exercises that followed North Korea’s latest test.

Seoul reportedly said Monday that it believes Pyongyang is preparing additional missile launches, including a potential ICBM. 

Meanwhile, NBC News reported that Trump will speak with South Korean President Moon Jae In on Monday.

North Korea in July conducted two intercontinental ballistic missile tests and has conducted numerous missile tests throughout this year. 

Haley on Monday emphasized the need for the strongest response yet to North Korea, noting the Security Council’s recent unity by unanimously adopting sanctions against Pyongyang last month.

U.S. officials in recent weeks have ramped up the rhetoric about North Korea amid frustrations over its missile tests.

President Trump last month threatened “fire and fury” should the North Korea continue to threaten the U.S.

- Updated at 11:35 a.m. EST